• Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
  • Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
  • Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
  • Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
  • Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
  • Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
  • Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
  • Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)
Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)

Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725)

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  • Compatible with MacBook Pro Retina 15" (Mid 2012, Early 2013)
  • Next-generation SATA III 6Gb/s interface
  • Free download of Jet Drive Toolbox SSD monitoring software
  • External enclosure is fully compatible with Super Speed USB 3.0 & Hi-Speed USB 2.0
  • SSD upgrade kit included, Repurpose original SSD into external SSD
  • Dual color LED indicator (Power, data transfer and USB 3.0/2.0 connection)
  • Operating Temperature 32F-158F

Customer Reviews

Great drive and easy to follow instructions makes this customer very happy. Oh, did I mention a 5 year warranty on the SSD? Drive worked great in replacing my wife's mid-2012 MBP with 15" retina display. She was running out of space and the computer was not functioning as it should. I ordered this drive to double her capacity and replace the OEM 256GB SSD drive from Apple. The instructions are super clear and the cloning, uninstallation of the old SSD and installation of the new SSD HD all took place without any issues. I would do follow the instructions exactly as explained. Secondly, view a You Tube video of the disassembly of the MBP...this is important as the screws on the bottom of the MBP are three different sizes. I utilized the old hard drive as a external SSD hard drive for my computer and my daughters. The enclosure provided does get warm, but does not burn you. Just be aware of this issue. Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725) 5Sudden Lost of OS Complete Failure. Installed it on Mac Book MID 2012. Lasted only 1.5 year and all my data is lost great that I backed up all my file. The Hard Disk failed why I was doing presentation and decided to close the lid during break. After opening the Mac Book Lid I found the error no "OS" the disk is not even recognized by the CPU. I had to reinstall my old M.2 to use the CPU again. Won't buy again from Transcend. Just submitted my RMA lets see how good is the customer service. 1Great addition to my MacBook Pro This is a great product but there is one missing step in the installation instructions that took me a long very frustrating time to figure out. In order to back up your existing hard drive to the new unit the FIRST thing you have to do is make sure that the current hard drive is not storing encrypted data. It will not backup if you have encryption turned on!!. So decrypt the existing hard drive first and then follow the rest of the instructions for transferring the data.Also when removing the screws from the case take careful note of their position because there is at least one screw that is longer than the rest. Hind sight being 20/20 I would layout the screws on a large piece of duct tape or scotch tape so that the exact order is retained. I just threw all the screws into a saucer and so did not register the subtle differences in size.Disk drive has been working great from day 1 and I really appreciate the additional space. 5glad to do this! After struggling with what to delete, I made the plunge to this drive to replace my 512GB original rmbp mid 2012 SSD drive. I needed a larger Windows partition for Windows 10.I did follow the instructions that came with, but used the ifixit instructions for removing the drive including disconnecting the battery. https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBook+Pro+15-Inch+Retina+Display+Mid+2012+SSD+Replacement/9706It probably took me <1.5 hours end to end including dust cleanup with a vacuum while I was in there. Lots of dust in the fans.For step 8 of Transcend instructions, I found the SSD drive was extremely hot. I took off the bottom cover hoping air flow would help. The estimates for time to complete were not reliable. At one point, I was afraid it was stuck but it finally moved on.I used the packaging clear covers to hold the screws. The included tools were perfect although I do have a set already.My macbook was out of warranty in June so I am not concerned or even know if that's a factor.I'm looking forward to life with lots of space for the next year and my kids are looking forward to my hand me down after that. 5Excellent Value & Performance. Simple to Install. Complete Kit. Possibly Wise to Upgrade Sooner. TRIM can now be Enabled. Mar 2015. This is a wonderful product and if you need the space, I highly recommend it along with the other reviewers who thoroughly cover it's excellent performance, value, simplicity of installation - watch the video - and well thought out features including a nice case for your old SSD drive.Transcend has really focused on the MacBookPro market and done a fantastic job. Unfortunately, when you first investigate this drive and try to decide if it is a good choice, you will immediately read that Yosemite does not support something called TRIM on third party SSD drives like the Transcend JetDrive. This is confusing and caused me to do a lot of research.Top Level Summary: if you need the space, I think the TRIM issue shouldn't be a factor in your decision.TRIM is desirable, but I think you can safely buy this drive and not worry about TRIM. If you are interested in the benefits of TRIM, the rest of this note explains how to safely and simply enable TRIM periodically. The best news is that even if you want the benefits of TRIM, there is no urgency as you can always run TRIM later whenever you want to.Two quick notes that I think add to the discussion:1) Availability - it is probably wise to buy sooner rather than later because in it's most recent products, Apple is moving from SSD's with the SATA III interface to SSD's with the PCIe interface. The very specific nature of Transcend JetDrive means that it addresses a limited market: a SATA III interface SSD that will fit in a MacBookPro. The newest MacBookPro Retina now uses an SSD with a PCIe interface. As a result, if you are interested in upgrading the size of your MacBookPro SSD, it might be wise to buy this sooner rather than later, in case availability of a SATA III SSD that will fit in the MacBookPro becomes an issue as the PCIe SSD's become dominant in Apple's product line.2) As others have pointed out, TRIM is important but not critical. You can buy this drive and not worry about TRIM. However, if you want to have the benefits of TRIM, a small amount of effort makes it possible. Unfortunately, Transcend can't supply this directly, but you can do it yourself quite easily.Long discussion on TRIM below:A1. Apple uses TRIMMavericks and Yosemite continuously run TRIM on Apple supplied SSD's. However, for obvious but unwise business reasons, Apple will not run TRIM on third party SSD's. Hence to run TRIM on the JetDrive 725 will take you some additional steps. However, it is only necessary to run TRIM when you notice your SSD performance seems slow. This would likely happen only after a few months of normal use or when the drive starts to become full. In that case, with a small amount of effort, TRIM can be run as a batch process that TRIM's the entire disk. If you don't mind an occasional inconvenience, you can easily run it periodically as part of your normal usage patterns (once a month? twice a year?).A2. 960GB of Laptop Space is GreatIn my opinion, TRIM is probably not a reason to hesitate on purchasing this drive if you want the additional space. For example, if you use your MacBookPro for digital photography, a 960GB drive is extremely nice. With a Nikon D800 a "typical" photo shoot event runs me about 10 - 20 GB of raw photos before I can select out the photos that seem best. Also, I use Google Nik software filters, and because they use the lossless but horribly inefficient TIFF format, they create a 100MB copy of every one of the photos they touch.B1. TRIM is Important, Not CriticalTRIM is important but it isn't critical. Even though Mavericks and Yosemite run TRIM continuously on Apple supplied SSD's, because of the nature of the kind of problem that TRIM is designed to solve, it doesn't have to run continuously. TRIM is only necessary if you notice your SSD performance isn't as good as when you first installed it.B2. TRIM using an Alternate Boot Disk - booting off of an SDHC or SDXC Flash driveOnce TRIM is enabled, as Allan Marcus pointed out in his Mac OS X Hints post, it can be run in batch mode by Apple Disk Utility under the Repair Volume command. Note: Disk Utility cannot run TRIM without first enabling TRIM, so you have two tasks: create an alternate boot disk and then enabling TRIM on that boot disk.With a TRIM enabled Yosemite running on an inexpensive SDHC or SDXC Flash Drive, it is simple to use the normal Mac interface to occasionally (once a month? Twice a year?) run TRIM. Running TRIM periodically with Disk Utility requires an alternate boot drive, because Disk Utility unmounts the disk it is working on. It is possible to use the Apple Recovery Partition and "single user mode" to try to work around this, but it's not worth it. Keeping an inexpensive SDXC backup copy of your OS and Applications is probably a good practice anyway.B3. Copying Your OS and Applications to a Flash DriveOne way to have the benefits of TRIM is to copy your Yosemite OS and Applications to an SD card flash drive. For that purpose, I used a 128 GB flash drive and Carbon Copy Cloner. My OS and Applications would easily fit within 64GB, but I used a 128GB card because I wanted the extra space and I liked the JetDriveLite form factor.B4. Once you have a bootable flash drive - Sequence to run a batch TRIM operation0) backup your entire JetDrive. This is always a good idea because SSD's do fail. Make sure your MacBookPro is plugged into working AC power and your battery is already fully charged in case of a power outage. The steps you will follow are very benign, but backing up is always a good practice whenever you "touch" a disk.1) set your startup volume to be the MacOS you copied onto a SDHC or SDXC flash drive and reboot2) download (cindori.org Trim Enabler $10) and install ( this will install on your flash drive)3) enable TRIM using the convenient TRIM Enabler control panel,4) run Disk Utility to TRIM your drive - Open Disk Utility. Select your drive on the left pane, Click "Repair Disk."-- Is it dangerous to run Repair Disk on a healthy disk? No. Not unless you have a power interruption, so use AC power and run repair disk when your battery is fully charged.-- There are two philosophies: "don't fix what's not broken," and preventative care. Because filesystems are entirely deterministic, I think preventative care is the better choice. In principle, a Repair Disk operation can only discover inconsistencies, it cannot cause them. My experience from rotating platter HDD's includes filesystem inconsistencies ("B-trees" or mismatches in the numbers of allocated blocks) which were repaired. In at least two cases on old HDD's I needed Drive Genius to rebuild the directory table. In those cases I only lost one or two files, not the entire data set. My experience with SSD's is limited, but I have not seen those kind of errors on any SSD's I've used. I've had an Apple supplied SSD fail completely in my MacBookPro 15" Retina Early 2013, but luckily, I had a backup.-- So, unless a power interruption occurs (working AC power is important), repairing a healthy disk filesystem is a benign process.-- If you are unlucky enough to have major problems, the Repair operation may abort. If that happens, you need to switch your efforts from trying to get TRIM to run, to fixing the filesystem data on your SSD. Drive Genius is very useful in this case if you want to fix it yourself, but if not, take everything in to an Apple store or other experienced computer professional. If even Drive Genius is unsuccessful, you can always reformat your laptop SSD and restore from your backup, however in this case you may have an unreliable SSD and you might want to replace it.5) toward the end of Repair Disk processing, you will see in the log the line "Trimming unused blocks"-- if you don't see that, then TRIM wasn't enabled and you need to check the TRIM Enabler control panel again to be sure you enabled TRIM.-- also, you can check "About This Mac" / "System Report" / "SATA/SATA Express" and look for "TRIM Support"-- If you install the Transcend utility, JetDriveToolbox, be aware that it is unintentionally misleading. Even when TRIM is not enabled in the MacOS, under "DRIVE" it says "Trim Command Supported" but that refers to the SSD controller in the JetDrive - not the full OS - so you can't use that to judge the status of TRIM on your computer.6) when Repair Disk is completed, disable TRIM,-- this last step is important. you need to disable TRIM using the convenient TRIM Enabler control panel-- if you forget, it's not terrible, but you are leaving your system a little more vulnerable-- also, other users have reported in the forums a subtle result from "turning off" the Apple "signed kernel" protection. If you haven't used a clean install to put Yosemite on your computer ( I almost never use clean install), you might have old and incompatible MacOS extensions in your System folder. When Trim Enabler has enabled TRIM, it also changes a setting in the laptop nvram that tells Yosemite to ignore the "signed kernel" requirement. If you forget to disable TRIM, those old extensions will load and may cause subtle problems in other programs (like Airplay shows video but not audio). This is unlikely, but it did show up in some of the forums.7) set your JetDrive 725 as the startup volume and rebootYou are done. You can perform this sequence every now and then as a preventative measure or just wait until you think you are getting poor write performance out of your SSD.Finally, you don't have to run TRIM if you never notice your SSD performance isn't as good as when you bought it. Technically TRIM does help SSD "wear," but SSD manufacturers do not rely on TRIM for their longevity. In any event, it is absolutely not critical to run TRIM frequently, so you truly don't have to worry about TRIM unless you notice a performance problem .B5. Enabling TRIM for Third Party SSD's - ReferenceAs cited by Rich in the Amazon Q&A section, the issues surrounding third party SSD's, Yosemite, and TRIM are explained in detail on http://www.cindori.org/trim-enabler-and-yosemite/ by Oskar Groth. This is well worth reading if you are interested.B6. Enabling TRIM for Third Party SSD's - What is TRIM and its importance?TRIM is an important capability and I wish Apple's policy on third party SSD solutions did not make this a concern. However, for anyone considering the wonderful Transcend JetDrive product and concerned about the question of TRIM, as I explained above, I am convinced that it is possible to run TRIM without a major inconvenience or risk. TRIM is "not required," but because an SSD write operation requires an earlier erase, it means that over time an SSD with normal activity will start to have lots of blocks of data that have been "deleted" in the MacOS, but not erased on the SSD by the SSD controller.SSD's aren't designed around a specific filesystem, so the SSD controller isn't built to understand any of the specifics of the MacOS filesystem. Even though the allocation tables the MacOS uses to assign and de-assign (or "delete") the blocks used by a particular file are stored on the SSD, the controller itself can't read or understand the allocation tables and does not know which SSD blocks the OS has marked as "deleted" and hence, are ready to erase. That is why finding which blocks toTRIM must be an Operating System function, not an SSD controller function.Eventually, as the number of "un-erased but deleted" blocks increase, the MacOS will start to have a significant number of writes that occur on blocks that require an erase cycle first, and write performance will suffer significantly on those writes.There are interesting details in how an SSD works, and to some extent the SSD moves data around on its own for longevity purposes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Write_amplification). As a consequence of moving the data, the likelihood of having lots of "un-erased but deleted" blocks is reduced. For this reason, TRIM may not be as necessary, however, it is factually true that any system capable of running TRIM does - including Apple's MacBookPro implementation of SSD's in Mavericks and Yosemite.The trick is that Apple has made it "more difficult" to run TRIM on third party SSD drives in Yosemite because of a new security feature. Yosemite's default is to only boot from a "kernel" that is "signed." A "signed kernel" means that Apple can guarantee that it is more difficult for malware to corrupt the basic operating system. Whether this is a good feature or not can be debated, but it seems desirable to me as one more small step at fighting off potential attacks on your computer.It seems clear that TRIM is very useful for most people over time, and one important point is that because it is a filesystem function, it can be invoked as a batch operation using Apple's Disk Utility.B7. Example Disk Utility Log (command line - you can use the GUI)Specifically, if you enable TRIM (Trim Enabler from cindori.org is one method) and run the Apple Disk Utility and select Repair Volume, the Disk Utility will trim the unused/deleted blocks by commanding the SSD controller to erase the list of blocks it sends.Transcript of a Trim sessionThe command line below runs diskutil on the JetDrive volume labeled "myDrive" and mounted in my alternate boot Flash OS as /Volumes/myDrive. My setup is slightly more complicated as I split my jetDrive into two partitions.diskutil repairvolume /Volumes/myDriveStarted file system repair on disk0s4 myDriveRepairing file systemChecking Journaled HFS Plus volumeChecking extents overflow fileChecking catalog fileChecking multi-linked filesChecking catalog hierarchyChecking extended attributes fileChecking volume bitmapChecking volume informationTrimming unused blocks <---- this line shows that the MacOS TRIM operation has been run to tell the SSD which blocks on the volume are unused and need to be "erased"The volume Users appears to be OKFile system check exit code is 0Updating boot support partitions for the volume as requiredFinished file system repair on disk0s4 myDrive 5Incompatible issue Update:After 3 weeks of use here the issues I found:1. The tools they give me looks refurbished and not new because the name and logo on the second tool is unclear. See the picture below.2. Everyday it would require 3 to 5 reboot/shutdown because the drive could not be detected. See the picture belowOverall its not worth it.--I bought this last December 28, 2016 and it arrived exactly in The Philippines on January 3, 2017. Here is my review on it.Hardware:The complete package looks great it has the same apple style packaging with complete tools on it. The only drawback that I saw is the poor USB cable that I received. See picture below. We have this CD-R King store in The Philippines which sells cheap China made cables, hardware and all your IT needs and they are way better than this.All I ask is a cable that is not defective in all aspect.The SSD works great it was fast and better than my original 256 and so far I am happy with it.Software Installation:The moment I perform Disk Utility to erase the new SSD every works according to their instruction except during restoration. The issues comes with the Apple FileValut Encryption. I activate it during El Capitan installtion because Apple suggest it. It took 8hrs to decrypt all my files and once done I still have to figure out that I need to perform First Aid in Disk Utility to repair the bugs in encryption. Everything went smooth after this.Overall, it took me 13hrs to restore everything due to issues and research for fix. It's not Transcend fault. Right now I am happy with everything on my Mac I just hope next time you can fix the cable thing. 1Dead simple to install with a nice speed increase Installation was simple and straightforward. The instructions in the little included booklet are correct, complete, short & sweet.Almost gave only 4 stars for achieving the advertised speeds, but after several tests, I did finally get close. Yes, the promises say "up to" 570MB/s read and 460MB/s write, but the absolute best I got was 500MB/s read and 430MB/s write. That's with no load, and no other application disk access. It's close enough to the promised speeds to bump my rating up to 5 stars.The included aluminum enclosure is very nice and nearly as well made as the Mac body itself. I don't know what more I could ask for. 5Very simple, effective upgrade. I have a Mid 2012 Macbook Pro Retina. I LOVE this machine. I got the 16GB RAM upgrade, and the biggest SSD at the time : The 512GB version. I use it to run multiple VMs for testing ideas, or troubleshooting by setting up a clean environment to test instead of one that has grown organically.Anyways, with my testing VMs, 512GB wasn't enough. I ordered this, and set to installing it.Very simple, took about 15 minutes of interactive work (plus 25 minutes to clone the partition and about 5 hours to encrypt the 460GB on the new drive)Put the new drive in the provided enclosure (3 minutes)Boot the mac in recovery (hold Command-R after the startup sound)Initialize the new drive with disk utilitiesClone the partition ( about 25 minutes with my 460GB of data)Boot to the new partition to make sure it worksshut down the macCrack the Mac, swap the new drive with old (about 15 minutes - incredibly easy except for the tiny screws holding the back on)Boot it and go.Feels just as fast, and now I have double the space. The provided enclosure is very nice, with surprisingly quick access via USB3. 5Great product, simply install, reliable so far. A+ I bought the JetDrive 725 for my MBP after reading dozens of bad reviews and horror stories about the SSD's sold by OWC. A couple of years ago I installed a Mercury SSD from OWC in my wife's MBP, and it failed after less than a year. Granted they replaced it on warranty (I've always had great service from OWC), but I chose to go with the JetDrive this time to avoid a repeat. The JetDrive came with a handy USB enclosure that made the data transfer and installation process a snap. I did not have any of the installation woes that others have reported with earlier versions of this SSD (I did not have to file the circuit board or anything). So far the drive has performed flawlessly (over a month now). read/write speeds test significantly better than the factory (sandisk) SSD that I removed, but to be honest I don't see a huge performance improvement in the day to day usage of the PC. So far I'm very pleased with this product. 5Not cheap but worth the money and you get what you pay for. I bought the Transcend JetDrive 480gb SSD because I only had about 16gb of space left on my 15" MacBook Pro Retina and it was really easy to clone using "CopyCat Cloner" The SSD includes all the tools you need (2 Torx screwdrivers) to install the new ssd into your computer and an all metal enclosure that you can not only use for cloning your new drive but you can install your old ssd into it to create an additional external storage drive. The SSD also comes with a cable, so everything you need is included in this nicely packaged product.Once I cloned the new ssd from my computer's ssd I installed in into my late 2012 - Early 2013 MacBook Pro and the drive works every bit as fast as my original ssd and I have twice the storage space.Once I installed the new SSD I did notice my computer was slower booting up, to fix this I started the MBP and holding the option key and booted it up using the "backup drive" when I turned the computer off once it booted up the computer ask which drive to boot to at start up I clicked the Transcend SSD (the only option available) and booted the computer again and BAM! it booted just as fast as it did before, problem solved. 5
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Description
  • Compatible with MacBook Pro Retina 15" (Mid 2012, Early 2013)
  • Next-generation SATA III 6Gb/s interface
  • Free download of Jet Drive Toolbox SSD monitoring software
  • External enclosure is fully compatible with Super Speed USB 3.0 & Hi-Speed USB 2.0
  • SSD upgrade kit included, Repurpose original SSD into external SSD
  • Dual color LED indicator (Power, data transfer and USB 3.0/2.0 connection)
  • Operating Temperature 32F-158F
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Great drive and easy to follow instructions makes this customer very happy. Oh, did I mention a 5 year warranty on the SSD? Drive worked great in replacing my wife's mid-2012 MBP with 15" retina display. She was running out of space and the computer was not functioning as it should. I ordered this drive to double her capacity and replace the OEM 256GB SSD drive from Apple. The instructions are super clear and the cloning, uninstallation of the old SSD and installation of the new SSD HD all took place without any issues. I would do follow the instructions exactly as explained. Secondly, view a You Tube video of the disassembly of the MBP...this is important as the screws on the bottom of the MBP are three different sizes. I utilized the old hard drive as a external SSD hard drive for my computer and my daughters. The enclosure provided does get warm, but does not burn you. Just be aware of this issue. Transcend 480GB JetDrive 725 SATAIII 6Gb/s Solid State Drive Update Kit for MacBook Pro 15" with Retina Display, Mid 2012 - Early 2013 (TS480GJDM725) 5Sudden Lost of OS Complete Failure. Installed it on Mac Book MID 2012. Lasted only 1.5 year and all my data is lost great that I backed up all my file. The Hard Disk failed why I was doing presentation and decided to close the lid during break. After opening the Mac Book Lid I found the error no "OS" the disk is not even recognized by the CPU. I had to reinstall my old M.2 to use the CPU again. Won't buy again from Transcend. Just submitted my RMA lets see how good is the customer service. 1Great addition to my MacBook Pro This is a great product but there is one missing step in the installation instructions that took me a long very frustrating time to figure out. In order to back up your existing hard drive to the new unit the FIRST thing you have to do is make sure that the current hard drive is not storing encrypted data. It will not backup if you have encryption turned on!!. So decrypt the existing hard drive first and then follow the rest of the instructions for transferring the data.Also when removing the screws from the case take careful note of their position because there is at least one screw that is longer than the rest. Hind sight being 20/20 I would layout the screws on a large piece of duct tape or scotch tape so that the exact order is retained. I just threw all the screws into a saucer and so did not register the subtle differences in size.Disk drive has been working great from day 1 and I really appreciate the additional space. 5glad to do this! After struggling with what to delete, I made the plunge to this drive to replace my 512GB original rmbp mid 2012 SSD drive. I needed a larger Windows partition for Windows 10.I did follow the instructions that came with, but used the ifixit instructions for removing the drive including disconnecting the battery. https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/MacBook+Pro+15-Inch+Retina+Display+Mid+2012+SSD+Replacement/9706It probably took me <1.5 hours end to end including dust cleanup with a vacuum while I was in there. Lots of dust in the fans.For step 8 of Transcend instructions, I found the SSD drive was extremely hot. I took off the bottom cover hoping air flow would help. The estimates for time to complete were not reliable. At one point, I was afraid it was stuck but it finally moved on.I used the packaging clear covers to hold the screws. The included tools were perfect although I do have a set already.My macbook was out of warranty in June so I am not concerned or even know if that's a factor.I'm looking forward to life with lots of space for the next year and my kids are looking forward to my hand me down after that. 5Excellent Value & Performance. Simple to Install. Complete Kit. Possibly Wise to Upgrade Sooner. TRIM can now be Enabled. Mar 2015. This is a wonderful product and if you need the space, I highly recommend it along with the other reviewers who thoroughly cover it's excellent performance, value, simplicity of installation - watch the video - and well thought out features including a nice case for your old SSD drive.Transcend has really focused on the MacBookPro market and done a fantastic job. Unfortunately, when you first investigate this drive and try to decide if it is a good choice, you will immediately read that Yosemite does not support something called TRIM on third party SSD drives like the Transcend JetDrive. This is confusing and caused me to do a lot of research.Top Level Summary: if you need the space, I think the TRIM issue shouldn't be a factor in your decision.TRIM is desirable, but I think you can safely buy this drive and not worry about TRIM. If you are interested in the benefits of TRIM, the rest of this note explains how to safely and simply enable TRIM periodically. The best news is that even if you want the benefits of TRIM, there is no urgency as you can always run TRIM later whenever you want to.Two quick notes that I think add to the discussion:1) Availability - it is probably wise to buy sooner rather than later because in it's most recent products, Apple is moving from SSD's with the SATA III interface to SSD's with the PCIe interface. The very specific nature of Transcend JetDrive means that it addresses a limited market: a SATA III interface SSD that will fit in a MacBookPro. The newest MacBookPro Retina now uses an SSD with a PCIe interface. As a result, if you are interested in upgrading the size of your MacBookPro SSD, it might be wise to buy this sooner rather than later, in case availability of a SATA III SSD that will fit in the MacBookPro becomes an issue as the PCIe SSD's become dominant in Apple's product line.2) As others have pointed out, TRIM is important but not critical. You can buy this drive and not worry about TRIM. However, if you want to have the benefits of TRIM, a small amount of effort makes it possible. Unfortunately, Transcend can't supply this directly, but you can do it yourself quite easily.Long discussion on TRIM below:A1. Apple uses TRIMMavericks and Yosemite continuously run TRIM on Apple supplied SSD's. However, for obvious but unwise business reasons, Apple will not run TRIM on third party SSD's. Hence to run TRIM on the JetDrive 725 will take you some additional steps. However, it is only necessary to run TRIM when you notice your SSD performance seems slow. This would likely happen only after a few months of normal use or when the drive starts to become full. In that case, with a small amount of effort, TRIM can be run as a batch process that TRIM's the entire disk. If you don't mind an occasional inconvenience, you can easily run it periodically as part of your normal usage patterns (once a month? twice a year?).A2. 960GB of Laptop Space is GreatIn my opinion, TRIM is probably not a reason to hesitate on purchasing this drive if you want the additional space. For example, if you use your MacBookPro for digital photography, a 960GB drive is extremely nice. With a Nikon D800 a "typical" photo shoot event runs me about 10 - 20 GB of raw photos before I can select out the photos that seem best. Also, I use Google Nik software filters, and because they use the lossless but horribly inefficient TIFF format, they create a 100MB copy of every one of the photos they touch.B1. TRIM is Important, Not CriticalTRIM is important but it isn't critical. Even though Mavericks and Yosemite run TRIM continuously on Apple supplied SSD's, because of the nature of the kind of problem that TRIM is designed to solve, it doesn't have to run continuously. TRIM is only necessary if you notice your SSD performance isn't as good as when you first installed it.B2. TRIM using an Alternate Boot Disk - booting off of an SDHC or SDXC Flash driveOnce TRIM is enabled, as Allan Marcus pointed out in his Mac OS X Hints post, it can be run in batch mode by Apple Disk Utility under the Repair Volume command. Note: Disk Utility cannot run TRIM without first enabling TRIM, so you have two tasks: create an alternate boot disk and then enabling TRIM on that boot disk.With a TRIM enabled Yosemite running on an inexpensive SDHC or SDXC Flash Drive, it is simple to use the normal Mac interface to occasionally (once a month? Twice a year?) run TRIM. Running TRIM periodically with Disk Utility requires an alternate boot drive, because Disk Utility unmounts the disk it is working on. It is possible to use the Apple Recovery Partition and "single user mode" to try to work around this, but it's not worth it. Keeping an inexpensive SDXC backup copy of your OS and Applications is probably a good practice anyway.B3. Copying Your OS and Applications to a Flash DriveOne way to have the benefits of TRIM is to copy your Yosemite OS and Applications to an SD card flash drive. For that purpose, I used a 128 GB flash drive and Carbon Copy Cloner. My OS and Applications would easily fit within 64GB, but I used a 128GB card because I wanted the extra space and I liked the JetDriveLite form factor.B4. Once you have a bootable flash drive - Sequence to run a batch TRIM operation0) backup your entire JetDrive. This is always a good idea because SSD's do fail. Make sure your MacBookPro is plugged into working AC power and your battery is already fully charged in case of a power outage. The steps you will follow are very benign, but backing up is always a good practice whenever you "touch" a disk.1) set your startup volume to be the MacOS you copied onto a SDHC or SDXC flash drive and reboot2) download (cindori.org Trim Enabler $10) and install ( this will install on your flash drive)3) enable TRIM using the convenient TRIM Enabler control panel,4) run Disk Utility to TRIM your drive - Open Disk Utility. Select your drive on the left pane, Click "Repair Disk."-- Is it dangerous to run Repair Disk on a healthy disk? No. Not unless you have a power interruption, so use AC power and run repair disk when your battery is fully charged.-- There are two philosophies: "don't fix what's not broken," and preventative care. Because filesystems are entirely deterministic, I think preventative care is the better choice. In principle, a Repair Disk operation can only discover inconsistencies, it cannot cause them. My experience from rotating platter HDD's includes filesystem inconsistencies ("B-trees" or mismatches in the numbers of allocated blocks) which were repaired. In at least two cases on old HDD's I needed Drive Genius to rebuild the directory table. In those cases I only lost one or two files, not the entire data set. My experience with SSD's is limited, but I have not seen those kind of errors on any SSD's I've used. I've had an Apple supplied SSD fail completely in my MacBookPro 15" Retina Early 2013, but luckily, I had a backup.-- So, unless a power interruption occurs (working AC power is important), repairing a healthy disk filesystem is a benign process.-- If you are unlucky enough to have major problems, the Repair operation may abort. If that happens, you need to switch your efforts from trying to get TRIM to run, to fixing the filesystem data on your SSD. Drive Genius is very useful in this case if you want to fix it yourself, but if not, take everything in to an Apple store or other experienced computer professional. If even Drive Genius is unsuccessful, you can always reformat your laptop SSD and restore from your backup, however in this case you may have an unreliable SSD and you might want to replace it.5) toward the end of Repair Disk processing, you will see in the log the line "Trimming unused blocks"-- if you don't see that, then TRIM wasn't enabled and you need to check the TRIM Enabler control panel again to be sure you enabled TRIM.-- also, you can check "About This Mac" / "System Report" / "SATA/SATA Express" and look for "TRIM Support"-- If you install the Transcend utility, JetDriveToolbox, be aware that it is unintentionally misleading. Even when TRIM is not enabled in the MacOS, under "DRIVE" it says "Trim Command Supported" but that refers to the SSD controller in the JetDrive - not the full OS - so you can't use that to judge the status of TRIM on your computer.6) when Repair Disk is completed, disable TRIM,-- this last step is important. you need to disable TRIM using the convenient TRIM Enabler control panel-- if you forget, it's not terrible, but you are leaving your system a little more vulnerable-- also, other users have reported in the forums a subtle result from "turning off" the Apple "signed kernel" protection. If you haven't used a clean install to put Yosemite on your computer ( I almost never use clean install), you might have old and incompatible MacOS extensions in your System folder. When Trim Enabler has enabled TRIM, it also changes a setting in the laptop nvram that tells Yosemite to ignore the "signed kernel" requirement. If you forget to disable TRIM, those old extensions will load and may cause subtle problems in other programs (like Airplay shows video but not audio). This is unlikely, but it did show up in some of the forums.7) set your JetDrive 725 as the startup volume and rebootYou are done. You can perform this sequence every now and then as a preventative measure or just wait until you think you are getting poor write performance out of your SSD.Finally, you don't have to run TRIM if you never notice your SSD performance isn't as good as when you bought it. Technically TRIM does help SSD "wear," but SSD manufacturers do not rely on TRIM for their longevity. In any event, it is absolutely not critical to run TRIM frequently, so you truly don't have to worry about TRIM unless you notice a performance problem .B5. Enabling TRIM for Third Party SSD's - ReferenceAs cited by Rich in the Amazon Q&A section, the issues surrounding third party SSD's, Yosemite, and TRIM are explained in detail on http://www.cindori.org/trim-enabler-and-yosemite/ by Oskar Groth. This is well worth reading if you are interested.B6. Enabling TRIM for Third Party SSD's - What is TRIM and its importance?TRIM is an important capability and I wish Apple's policy on third party SSD solutions did not make this a concern. However, for anyone considering the wonderful Transcend JetDrive product and concerned about the question of TRIM, as I explained above, I am convinced that it is possible to run TRIM without a major inconvenience or risk. TRIM is "not required," but because an SSD write operation requires an earlier erase, it means that over time an SSD with normal activity will start to have lots of blocks of data that have been "deleted" in the MacOS, but not erased on the SSD by the SSD controller.SSD's aren't designed around a specific filesystem, so the SSD controller isn't built to understand any of the specifics of the MacOS filesystem. Even though the allocation tables the MacOS uses to assign and de-assign (or "delete") the blocks used by a particular file are stored on the SSD, the controller itself can't read or understand the allocation tables and does not know which SSD blocks the OS has marked as "deleted" and hence, are ready to erase. That is why finding which blocks toTRIM must be an Operating System function, not an SSD controller function.Eventually, as the number of "un-erased but deleted" blocks increase, the MacOS will start to have a significant number of writes that occur on blocks that require an erase cycle first, and write performance will suffer significantly on those writes.There are interesting details in how an SSD works, and to some extent the SSD moves data around on its own for longevity purposes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Write_amplification). As a consequence of moving the data, the likelihood of having lots of "un-erased but deleted" blocks is reduced. For this reason, TRIM may not be as necessary, however, it is factually true that any system capable of running TRIM does - including Apple's MacBookPro implementation of SSD's in Mavericks and Yosemite.The trick is that Apple has made it "more difficult" to run TRIM on third party SSD drives in Yosemite because of a new security feature. Yosemite's default is to only boot from a "kernel" that is "signed." A "signed kernel" means that Apple can guarantee that it is more difficult for malware to corrupt the basic operating system. Whether this is a good feature or not can be debated, but it seems desirable to me as one more small step at fighting off potential attacks on your computer.It seems clear that TRIM is very useful for most people over time, and one important point is that because it is a filesystem function, it can be invoked as a batch operation using Apple's Disk Utility.B7. Example Disk Utility Log (command line - you can use the GUI)Specifically, if you enable TRIM (Trim Enabler from cindori.org is one method) and run the Apple Disk Utility and select Repair Volume, the Disk Utility will trim the unused/deleted blocks by commanding the SSD controller to erase the list of blocks it sends.Transcript of a Trim sessionThe command line below runs diskutil on the JetDrive volume labeled "myDrive" and mounted in my alternate boot Flash OS as /Volumes/myDrive. My setup is slightly more complicated as I split my jetDrive into two partitions.diskutil repairvolume /Volumes/myDriveStarted file system repair on disk0s4 myDriveRepairing file systemChecking Journaled HFS Plus volumeChecking extents overflow fileChecking catalog fileChecking multi-linked filesChecking catalog hierarchyChecking extended attributes fileChecking volume bitmapChecking volume informationTrimming unused blocks <---- this line shows that the MacOS TRIM operation has been run to tell the SSD which blocks on the volume are unused and need to be "erased"The volume Users appears to be OKFile system check exit code is 0Updating boot support partitions for the volume as requiredFinished file system repair on disk0s4 myDrive 5Incompatible issue Update:After 3 weeks of use here the issues I found:1. The tools they give me looks refurbished and not new because the name and logo on the second tool is unclear. See the picture below.2. Everyday it would require 3 to 5 reboot/shutdown because the drive could not be detected. See the picture belowOverall its not worth it.--I bought this last December 28, 2016 and it arrived exactly in The Philippines on January 3, 2017. Here is my review on it.Hardware:The complete package looks great it has the same apple style packaging with complete tools on it. The only drawback that I saw is the poor USB cable that I received. See picture below. We have this CD-R King store in The Philippines which sells cheap China made cables, hardware and all your IT needs and they are way better than this.All I ask is a cable that is not defective in all aspect.The SSD works great it was fast and better than my original 256 and so far I am happy with it.Software Installation:The moment I perform Disk Utility to erase the new SSD every works according to their instruction except during restoration. The issues comes with the Apple FileValut Encryption. I activate it during El Capitan installtion because Apple suggest it. It took 8hrs to decrypt all my files and once done I still have to figure out that I need to perform First Aid in Disk Utility to repair the bugs in encryption. Everything went smooth after this.Overall, it took me 13hrs to restore everything due to issues and research for fix. It's not Transcend fault. Right now I am happy with everything on my Mac I just hope next time you can fix the cable thing. 1Dead simple to install with a nice speed increase Installation was simple and straightforward. The instructions in the little included booklet are correct, complete, short & sweet.Almost gave only 4 stars for achieving the advertised speeds, but after several tests, I did finally get close. Yes, the promises say "up to" 570MB/s read and 460MB/s write, but the absolute best I got was 500MB/s read and 430MB/s write. That's with no load, and no other application disk access. It's close enough to the promised speeds to bump my rating up to 5 stars.The included aluminum enclosure is very nice and nearly as well made as the Mac body itself. I don't know what more I could ask for. 5Very simple, effective upgrade. I have a Mid 2012 Macbook Pro Retina. I LOVE this machine. I got the 16GB RAM upgrade, and the biggest SSD at the time : The 512GB version. I use it to run multiple VMs for testing ideas, or troubleshooting by setting up a clean environment to test instead of one that has grown organically.Anyways, with my testing VMs, 512GB wasn't enough. I ordered this, and set to installing it.Very simple, took about 15 minutes of interactive work (plus 25 minutes to clone the partition and about 5 hours to encrypt the 460GB on the new drive)Put the new drive in the provided enclosure (3 minutes)Boot the mac in recovery (hold Command-R after the startup sound)Initialize the new drive with disk utilitiesClone the partition ( about 25 minutes with my 460GB of data)Boot to the new partition to make sure it worksshut down the macCrack the Mac, swap the new drive with old (about 15 minutes - incredibly easy except for the tiny screws holding the back on)Boot it and go.Feels just as fast, and now I have double the space. The provided enclosure is very nice, with surprisingly quick access via USB3. 5Great product, simply install, reliable so far. A+ I bought the JetDrive 725 for my MBP after reading dozens of bad reviews and horror stories about the SSD's sold by OWC. A couple of years ago I installed a Mercury SSD from OWC in my wife's MBP, and it failed after less than a year. Granted they replaced it on warranty (I've always had great service from OWC), but I chose to go with the JetDrive this time to avoid a repeat. The JetDrive came with a handy USB enclosure that made the data transfer and installation process a snap. I did not have any of the installation woes that others have reported with earlier versions of this SSD (I did not have to file the circuit board or anything). So far the drive has performed flawlessly (over a month now). read/write speeds test significantly better than the factory (sandisk) SSD that I removed, but to be honest I don't see a huge performance improvement in the day to day usage of the PC. So far I'm very pleased with this product. 5Not cheap but worth the money and you get what you pay for. I bought the Transcend JetDrive 480gb SSD because I only had about 16gb of space left on my 15" MacBook Pro Retina and it was really easy to clone using "CopyCat Cloner" The SSD includes all the tools you need (2 Torx screwdrivers) to install the new ssd into your computer and an all metal enclosure that you can not only use for cloning your new drive but you can install your old ssd into it to create an additional external storage drive. The SSD also comes with a cable, so everything you need is included in this nicely packaged product.Once I cloned the new ssd from my computer's ssd I installed in into my late 2012 - Early 2013 MacBook Pro and the drive works every bit as fast as my original ssd and I have twice the storage space.Once I installed the new SSD I did notice my computer was slower booting up, to fix this I started the MBP and holding the option key and booted it up using the "backup drive" when I turned the computer off once it booted up the computer ask which drive to boot to at start up I clicked the Transcend SSD (the only option available) and booted the computer again and BAM! it booted just as fast as it did before, problem solved. 5
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