• Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver
  • Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver
  • Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver
  • Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver
Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver
Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver
Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver
Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver

Rokinon FE75MFT-S 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye Lens for Micro Four Thirds (Olympus PEN and Panasonic),Silver

SKU:HA5TOU80E
Sale price
SG$ 502.00
Regular price
SG$ 836.00
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per 
( 39% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days

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  • 180 degrees angle of view
  • 9 elements in 7 groups
  • Aperture range F3.5-22
  • Minimum focusing distance of 3.5? (0.09m)for enhanced close-up shots
  • Approximately 1.9 inches long

Customer Reviews

great lens for the pricefantastic lens. if you have micro 43 camera, this lens is a must for your prime lens collection. on your lens, set focal length at infinity and select your aperture and start shooting. no manual focusing required (unless you are up close). for camera setting with manual lens, set camera for aperture priority, manual, or auto.this lens is incredibly sharp at greater than f5.6. f3.5-4 is very slightly soft on the edges but minimally noticeable when shooting wide angle. remember that for a micro 43 sensor your photos will come out at 2x 7.5mm or 15mm (in full frame language). if you don't like the fish eye curve of your photo, you can use adobe lightroom to correct/edit. the sigma 15mm and cannon 15mm correction profile works well to transform your curved photos into 15mm wide angle photos. great lens for the price.5Well built and sharp.I'd say this is one of u43s best kept secret, but I don't believe it's a secret at all.If you want a full frame fish eye and don't need an ultra fast maximum aperture, this is a very good lens. It's extremely well built, and sharp through it's entire usable aperture range. Very small, solid, etc. The lens cap included clips nicely onto the built in lens hood, and as of yet hasn't fallen off on me. Given the short focal length the fact that it's manual focus is a non-issue. Just set the aperture to f 5.6 or 7.0 and set the focus to a bit short of infinity and pretty much everything in the frame that's more than about a foot away from the lens will be in focus in the shot.Remember that it's a fisheye - you'll need to watch where your fingers, toes, and loose bits of clothing are if you don't want any of that in the image.5A fun lensBeing a manual focus lens I was a bit hesitant getting it, but I am now so glad that I did! As others have written, you can pretty much set the aperture anywhere from f3.5 (wide open) on up and the focus to just short of infinity and everything from about a couple of feet or so to infinity will be in focus. Great for landscapes and unique perspectives. Not sure I could use for close focusing as my eyes would have trouble with that (and I don't think focus peaking on my OMD works with this lens works b/c there are no electrical contacts on the lens - if someone knows otherwise I'd really appreciate to know how to engage the focus peaking with this lens).5Great for the price.This is a fun fisheye lens. I have two problems with the lens. First, the micro 4/3 mount seems to be just slightly too large. It takes more force to insert the lens into my camera than my kit lens (Olympus OMD-EM10 camera). Second, the focus ring seems to be slightly misaligned. Focusing at "infinity" actually causes the background to blur slightly. To get the sharpest picture at infinity I actually have to keep the position of the focus ring slightly before the infinity mark. These two things lead me to believe that the lens is not made to high enough quality tolerances. Neither of these issues prevent the lens from working, and I am still happy with the lens. Once the lens is attached to the camera and I have taken the time to manually focus the image it takes great photos. Once focused properly, the sharpness is better than my Olympus kit lens. I'd be a lot harsher if the lens was more expensive. Since it's so cheap compared to other lenses in its class it can really make fisheye lens accessible for semi-professional / leisure photographers like me. I think it's a great lens for the money and would recommend it to friends.4Good value, fun to use. Need good lightI got this lens about a week ago, I've been using it and initially I was a bit disappointed, I do a lot of indoor shots in not-so-well lit areas, and I chase around my baby daughter trying to get a good photo. So at the beginning I was frustrated that most of my shots were coming out blurry, and the manual focus was not as easy as I thought it would be. I was going to send it back, but I really wanted to have fisheye photography as part of my micro43 capabilities. I knew that getting sharp pictures with this lens would be toughter than my other lenses with AF, once I got the hang of it and made the right adjustments to my camera I was able to learn how to use this piece of glass, which kind-of makes it more fun! To really pay attention to what you are doing rather than just letting the camera/lens do all the work.Like I said, I was going to send it back, then I realized that I expecting too much out of it, yes, it is manual focus/manual aperture, but really, you cannot find a fisheye lens for the micro43 for cheaper than this, unless you want to use one of those adapters that screw-on top of the kit lens, which are horrible and do not produce usable shots. So I think the lens is good value for its cost and the picture quality that it is capable of, it also has a solid built for its price.I think it really comes down to how you use this lens; I found that as long as I was in a well-lit place I was able to get good shots with decent sharpness. I use the M or A mode, with the focus-peaking on the OM-D. Focusing can be tricky, so I mostly keep the focus ring on 'infinity' and aperture on F8-F11 to maintain most of the frame in focus. But to have a small aperture like that you need to be in a well lit place, or use a slow shutter speed, or bump-up the ISO way up. I use a combination of all depending on what I'm shooting.Why not 5 stars? well, here are my pros/cons, which after I evaluated them I gave the lens a subjective score of 4 stars for its capability and value:Pros:+Small sized, light-weight, great metallic (or at least it feels like it) built+Great image quality in well-lit areas+At $259, this is the best option for good quality fisheye photographs on a micro43rd+Fun to shoot having full manual control of aperture and focus, allowing you to concentrate on each shot (which maybe a con too)Cons:-Hard to nail focus correctly on fast moving subjects-Tough to get usable shots in low-light-Must learn how to use and get used to it before you start to get really good shots-Focus ring is too-tough to turn, I wish is was smoother-Manual aperture can easily slip up or down if you are not careful-Integrated plastic lenshood does not feel as solid as the body of the lens, it can get easily scratchedOverall, like I said, this is great value for what you get. You can wait for another paycheck and/or splurge twice the cost of this lens and get the 8mm Pany (~$640) and let the lens and the camera do all of the work, or you can save some money, work on your technique, and have fun at it. For a lens you do not use all the time, I think the price is just right.UPDATE 1/26/2014: I've had the lens for some time now and I am getting great results. II bumped up the score to 5 stars because the value of this lens is really fenomenal! Also, figured out that (if you are using the OMD-EM5) you have to change the settings on the camera's stabilization (IBIS) to below 8mm, once you do that, it makes it a lot easier to shoot and prevent motion blur. I still do think you need good light if using a small aperture to get everything in-focus. Overall, I'm very pleased with the quality of this lens. Worth every penny!5A Whole new vision....first WOW lens in a long time! Minimum distortion, super sharp images!A whole new photography experience! A fisheye that is usable! I am shooting flowers, and macro photography. Using an Olympus E5-Mark II....the secret...set your camera IS to 8mm. You HAVE TO TELL THE CAMERA! In IS Mode, I select INFO and then set the lens focal length. The default was 70 mm. MUST remember to change back to 70mm or set up Mode buttons for easy switch. This is my new favorite lens.I just preordered the NEW 7 to 14 mm zoom coming in August 2015. $1,299 but I think it would be my new "bestus" lens! I will post some pictures ASAP.....I have used it for two hours and feel in love again. I set the camera to P and then set the lens to the desire "f" stop. Mostly f8 to f22. I set the lens to 4 inches and manual "zoom" in and out with my hands.....in the view finder you can SEE the sharpness.....and just dial the exposure compensation to get great color. Easy.I shot videos , hand held, set to just short of infinity.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c8_EWAaHWU...stayed in focus thru out! Most difficult day, super bright Hawaiian sun, subject in the shade, hand held and walking around. It worked.5A tiny, high quality fisheye at a very reasonable priceThere are many excellent reviews of this lens, but I just have to add my own experiences on a recent vacation.- Build quality is exceptional. Metal mount. It feels quite solid, the manual focus ring is a treat to use. The aperture ring is clicky enough without being difficult to move.- Optically... it's really quite nice. If you buy this lens, you should be fully aware of the geometric distortion a fisheye provides. Color fringing is present wide open if you look for it, but it's minimal and usually there is no need to worry about correcting it. Sharpness is very good even wide open.- It's all manual, all the time. No electrical contacts here of any sort; you must set your camera to shoot with no lens attached (often not the default). Your best bet is probably using aperture priority, where the camera body will adjust the shutter speed (and optionally ISO) automatically to provide the proper exposure.- Manual focusing is a breeze. For the most part I just leave it set to infinity; it's not often I need to refocus on something closer with this lens.- The built in lens hood is OK, but it makes the lens somewhat bulkier than it absolutely had to be. You can receive some flare if the sun is in the frame, and that's sometimes hard to avoid with a lens like this. The design does not allow for front filters, which is about the only truly negative thing I could say about the lens.You can pay a whole lot more for a Panasonic fisheye with full electronic capability, but there's really little point with a lens like this. Autofocus is really not required given the huge DOF, and shooting in aperture priority using the aperture ring on the lens is darned near foolproof.So, for value and quality, five stars and a hearty recommendation. Before you buy, though, note: this exact lens is available under several names, and there is no telling which will be the cheapest at any given time. Be sure to check out e.g. the Bower Ultra-Wide 7.5mm f/3.5 Fisheye Lens for Micro 4/3 SLY75BM43 and compare prices before you buy.5Wow! Amazing image quality!Wow, this really is an amazingly good fisheye lens. At the price it is even more incredible.First, the image quality: At F/5.6 it is razor sharp all the way into the extreme corners, at F/3.5 (wide open) it is razor sharp across almost the entire frame and is showing just the tiniest bit of softness (only visible at 200% really) in the extreme corners. I have to say, when I opened my test shots in Lightroom my jaw just about dropped, I really did not expect performance this good. There is a bit of red/cyan lateral chromatic aberration. This was easily handled in Lightroom with the CA slider and any modern image editor should have a similar control.Second, the build: It is a well constructed lens. Most of the body is high quality plastic. The mount and base of lens is metal (the silver part of the black lens) as is the red ring. The rest of the lens body is plastic. The lens cap is an effective latching design that holds itself by the hood petals. This is nicer than a friction fit design, but it does require orienting the lens cap when attaching. It is a surprisingly small lens. Check online reviews to get a feel for the relative size. The focus ring is nicely damped. The aperture ring has a good feel and distinct clicks. It is a very small lens, so it does require some care to not bump one ring while adjusting the other.Third, the price: Fisheyes twice this price and twice the size often don't perform as well as this lens. Samyang/Rokinon has been making some impressive and reasonably priced lenses recently and this one should be near the top for value and performance.Finally, some hopefully helpful details and clarifications.This is an equal area projection fisheye lens, like most every fisheye on the market. Samyang does make a 8mm APS-C fisheye which is unusual in that it uses a stereographic projection. There was some confusion on the web as to the projection of this new 7.5mm when it came out, but I've tested and measured it and it is a equal area projection. Check the Wikipedia article on "Fisheye lens" for details on the different kinds of fisheye projections (mappings).This is an entirely manual lens, manual aperture and manual focus. There are a number of such lenses appearing for the micro-four-thirds cameras, but if you are not familiar with using such a lens do your homework! Essentially you will control the aperture with a ring on the lens and you will always have to manual focus. On many cameras you'll have to enable a setting somewhere like "shoot without lens" to let the camera know you are using a lens that has no electrical connection to the camera. For a fisheye this is not a big deal, you rarely focus the lens as the depth of field is so large. Manual focus is also quite easy on most micro-four-thirds cameras as you can zoom in liveview to check focus.At the risk of stating the obvious - this is a 180 degree fisheye lens which makes it a "specialty" lens. You might find it odd to use and the novelty may wear off over time. However, there is another way to use this lens. Using software (both free and for purchase) you can "de-fish" the lens by applying a transform to the images you take with it. You can make it look like a 7.5mm recti-linear lens. As this lens is very sharp it actually works really well. You can find many examples of people doing this on the web. One issue, it becomes a bit hard to compose when doing this - a lot of what you see in the viewfinder will be clipped once you "de-fish" the image in post processing.Bottom line, if you've ever wanted a fisheye lens and you own a micro-four-thirds camera this is the lens to get!5Superb in every wayThe lens is actually made by Samyang, and like other Samyang-made lenses will probably show up under various brand names. Mine is the Rokinon brand, purchased here on Amazon. Samyang has made a number of other fairly exotic lens designs such as their highly regarded 35mm f/1.4 and 85mm f/1.4. All are similar in that they contain no electronics and therefore must be used in a completely manual mode. In the case of this 7.5mm fisheye in Micro Four Thirds mount this presents no problems whatever and I don't even regard it as any sort of shortcoming. MFT cameras like the Panasonic G series are perfectly suited to this sort of lens -- just set the camera to "No lens" in the menu and it will take care of exposure automatically, in existing light.My Panasonic G1 and G2 cameras even can make good use of electronic flash indoors with this fisheye lens, under certain circumstances. Obviously no accessory flash unit will actually cover 180 degrees corner to corner to match the fisheye lens, but when shooting the length of my living room with a Nissin Di466 flash unit made for Four Thirds cameras, which has a zoom head that will cover lenses as short as 12mm, enough light bounces around from the off-white walls and ceiling to provide pretty good overall exposure, just some darkening in the extreme corners.Some have complained about the difficulty of focusing this manual-focus lens. In fact this is a non-issue, since the depth of field is so enormous, even wide open, that focusing can simply be ignored. Leave it set at infinity, or just slightly "cracked" from the infinity setting, and you will be fine in practically all ordinary circumstances. In the Micro Four Thirds format, the depth of field of a 7.5mm lens at f/3.5 set at infinity is 3.55 ft to infinity. Stopped down to f/5.6, depth of field is 2.17 ft to infinity. Does anyone need a greater range of sharpness than that?The Rokinon 7.5mm fisheye does focus of course; it focuses down to 0.08 meters, a bit closer than 0.3 feet. That is actually closer than it probably sounds to most people, since focus distance is measured in the traditional and correct way -- from subject to focal plane, not subject to lens. At closest focusing distance the subject is about a couple of inches in front of the lens. Really, the whole notion of focusing is rather whimsical with this lens anyway, except I suppose in some unusual circumstances that I can't even imagine. For most users just leaving the focus at or very, very close to infinity will be the best thing to do in most ordinary usage. Trying to improve sharpness by fiddling with the focus ring is unlikely to improve anything and may make things less sharp. Consider -- the marked distance next to infinity on the focus ring is 0.25 ft. But at that distance setting and f/5.6 for example, calculated depth of field is only 0.23 ft to 0.28 ft. It would be nice if there were a mark for hyperfocal distance at some useful aperture, but again, such a mark would be very, very close to the infinity mark.Everything about the Rokinon bespeaks quality. Construction feels very solid and the finish is great. Focus and aperture rings turn smoothly but with plenty of damping so they won't be accidentally moved off chosen settings. Sharpness is simply superb from edge to edge. This isn't just the opinion of myself and other users; the German lens testing site photozone.de using sophisticated modulation transfer function testing equipment gives the Rokinon very high marks.I love fisheyes and have had one for every complete camera system I've owned since about 1975. This Rokinon is by far the least expensive one I've owned, but I have as much confidence in it as I've had for any of the others.Highly recommended.5Yes, a manual fisheye for an EVF camera is a GOOD thing.This is a very cool lens for not much money.Ok, I know what you're thinking... MANUAL lens, and FISHEYE? The 1970s called, they want their lens back!But no, seriously, this makes a ton of sense. First, the MANUAL part. This is a 7.5mm lens. There's a focus control, sure, but the depth of field is absurdly deep anyway... you will never want for autofocus on this lens. If you're at infinity and f3.5, you're in focus from about 3.5ft to infinity. If you move off infinity a bit to take advantage of your hyperfocal range, you get another foot or so. You can focus, but it's not needed for many shoots.Manual aperture you say... in fact, I do. But think about it for a second... you're not using an SLR, you're using an EVF camera. When you stop down, your EVF adjusts. So unlike the case on an SLR camera, you don't really see that the lens is stopped down, at least with the range of the AGC in your viewfinder. This is the main reason manual-only lenses are pretty popular for EVF cameras. Well, that, and video.Next up... FISHEYE? Ain't that the silly circle of distortion in the middle of the image thing? Well, you're half-correct. This is a full-frame fisheye, equivalent to a 15mm fisheye on a 35mm camera. Fisheye is in the design, not specifically the focal length. A wide-angle lens attempts to be rectilinear -- straight lines stay straight. That's expensive. A fisheye allows linear distortion, which is why everyone knows the "fisheye effect". Thing is, we actually do live in the 21rst century now... there are tools to de-fisheye a fisheye shot. Google up "de-fisheye"... there are three or four easy ways in Photoshop to change a fisheye shot into a wide angle shot, if you're not happy with the fisheye look. Meanwhile, you have 180-degree coverage... that's wider than the way more expensive 12mm non-fisheye I have on my full-frame Canon DSLR.The build quality on this is great... it might look a little like the plasticy Olympus m43 kit lenses, but's made of higher quality plastic and metal parts. The image quality is very good at f3.5 and excellent at f5.6.5
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Description
  • 180 degrees angle of view
  • 9 elements in 7 groups
  • Aperture range F3.5-22
  • Minimum focusing distance of 3.5? (0.09m)for enhanced close-up shots
  • Approximately 1.9 inches long
Reviews

Customer Reviews

great lens for the pricefantastic lens. if you have micro 43 camera, this lens is a must for your prime lens collection. on your lens, set focal length at infinity and select your aperture and start shooting. no manual focusing required (unless you are up close). for camera setting with manual lens, set camera for aperture priority, manual, or auto.this lens is incredibly sharp at greater than f5.6. f3.5-4 is very slightly soft on the edges but minimally noticeable when shooting wide angle. remember that for a micro 43 sensor your photos will come out at 2x 7.5mm or 15mm (in full frame language). if you don't like the fish eye curve of your photo, you can use adobe lightroom to correct/edit. the sigma 15mm and cannon 15mm correction profile works well to transform your curved photos into 15mm wide angle photos. great lens for the price.5Well built and sharp.I'd say this is one of u43s best kept secret, but I don't believe it's a secret at all.If you want a full frame fish eye and don't need an ultra fast maximum aperture, this is a very good lens. It's extremely well built, and sharp through it's entire usable aperture range. Very small, solid, etc. The lens cap included clips nicely onto the built in lens hood, and as of yet hasn't fallen off on me. Given the short focal length the fact that it's manual focus is a non-issue. Just set the aperture to f 5.6 or 7.0 and set the focus to a bit short of infinity and pretty much everything in the frame that's more than about a foot away from the lens will be in focus in the shot.Remember that it's a fisheye - you'll need to watch where your fingers, toes, and loose bits of clothing are if you don't want any of that in the image.5A fun lensBeing a manual focus lens I was a bit hesitant getting it, but I am now so glad that I did! As others have written, you can pretty much set the aperture anywhere from f3.5 (wide open) on up and the focus to just short of infinity and everything from about a couple of feet or so to infinity will be in focus. Great for landscapes and unique perspectives. Not sure I could use for close focusing as my eyes would have trouble with that (and I don't think focus peaking on my OMD works with this lens works b/c there are no electrical contacts on the lens - if someone knows otherwise I'd really appreciate to know how to engage the focus peaking with this lens).5Great for the price.This is a fun fisheye lens. I have two problems with the lens. First, the micro 4/3 mount seems to be just slightly too large. It takes more force to insert the lens into my camera than my kit lens (Olympus OMD-EM10 camera). Second, the focus ring seems to be slightly misaligned. Focusing at "infinity" actually causes the background to blur slightly. To get the sharpest picture at infinity I actually have to keep the position of the focus ring slightly before the infinity mark. These two things lead me to believe that the lens is not made to high enough quality tolerances. Neither of these issues prevent the lens from working, and I am still happy with the lens. Once the lens is attached to the camera and I have taken the time to manually focus the image it takes great photos. Once focused properly, the sharpness is better than my Olympus kit lens. I'd be a lot harsher if the lens was more expensive. Since it's so cheap compared to other lenses in its class it can really make fisheye lens accessible for semi-professional / leisure photographers like me. I think it's a great lens for the money and would recommend it to friends.4Good value, fun to use. Need good lightI got this lens about a week ago, I've been using it and initially I was a bit disappointed, I do a lot of indoor shots in not-so-well lit areas, and I chase around my baby daughter trying to get a good photo. So at the beginning I was frustrated that most of my shots were coming out blurry, and the manual focus was not as easy as I thought it would be. I was going to send it back, but I really wanted to have fisheye photography as part of my micro43 capabilities. I knew that getting sharp pictures with this lens would be toughter than my other lenses with AF, once I got the hang of it and made the right adjustments to my camera I was able to learn how to use this piece of glass, which kind-of makes it more fun! To really pay attention to what you are doing rather than just letting the camera/lens do all the work.Like I said, I was going to send it back, then I realized that I expecting too much out of it, yes, it is manual focus/manual aperture, but really, you cannot find a fisheye lens for the micro43 for cheaper than this, unless you want to use one of those adapters that screw-on top of the kit lens, which are horrible and do not produce usable shots. So I think the lens is good value for its cost and the picture quality that it is capable of, it also has a solid built for its price.I think it really comes down to how you use this lens; I found that as long as I was in a well-lit place I was able to get good shots with decent sharpness. I use the M or A mode, with the focus-peaking on the OM-D. Focusing can be tricky, so I mostly keep the focus ring on 'infinity' and aperture on F8-F11 to maintain most of the frame in focus. But to have a small aperture like that you need to be in a well lit place, or use a slow shutter speed, or bump-up the ISO way up. I use a combination of all depending on what I'm shooting.Why not 5 stars? well, here are my pros/cons, which after I evaluated them I gave the lens a subjective score of 4 stars for its capability and value:Pros:+Small sized, light-weight, great metallic (or at least it feels like it) built+Great image quality in well-lit areas+At $259, this is the best option for good quality fisheye photographs on a micro43rd+Fun to shoot having full manual control of aperture and focus, allowing you to concentrate on each shot (which maybe a con too)Cons:-Hard to nail focus correctly on fast moving subjects-Tough to get usable shots in low-light-Must learn how to use and get used to it before you start to get really good shots-Focus ring is too-tough to turn, I wish is was smoother-Manual aperture can easily slip up or down if you are not careful-Integrated plastic lenshood does not feel as solid as the body of the lens, it can get easily scratchedOverall, like I said, this is great value for what you get. You can wait for another paycheck and/or splurge twice the cost of this lens and get the 8mm Pany (~$640) and let the lens and the camera do all of the work, or you can save some money, work on your technique, and have fun at it. For a lens you do not use all the time, I think the price is just right.UPDATE 1/26/2014: I've had the lens for some time now and I am getting great results. II bumped up the score to 5 stars because the value of this lens is really fenomenal! Also, figured out that (if you are using the OMD-EM5) you have to change the settings on the camera's stabilization (IBIS) to below 8mm, once you do that, it makes it a lot easier to shoot and prevent motion blur. I still do think you need good light if using a small aperture to get everything in-focus. Overall, I'm very pleased with the quality of this lens. Worth every penny!5A Whole new vision....first WOW lens in a long time! Minimum distortion, super sharp images!A whole new photography experience! A fisheye that is usable! I am shooting flowers, and macro photography. Using an Olympus E5-Mark II....the secret...set your camera IS to 8mm. You HAVE TO TELL THE CAMERA! In IS Mode, I select INFO and then set the lens focal length. The default was 70 mm. MUST remember to change back to 70mm or set up Mode buttons for easy switch. This is my new favorite lens.I just preordered the NEW 7 to 14 mm zoom coming in August 2015. $1,299 but I think it would be my new "bestus" lens! I will post some pictures ASAP.....I have used it for two hours and feel in love again. I set the camera to P and then set the lens to the desire "f" stop. Mostly f8 to f22. I set the lens to 4 inches and manual "zoom" in and out with my hands.....in the view finder you can SEE the sharpness.....and just dial the exposure compensation to get great color. Easy.I shot videos , hand held, set to just short of infinity.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c8_EWAaHWU...stayed in focus thru out! Most difficult day, super bright Hawaiian sun, subject in the shade, hand held and walking around. It worked.5A tiny, high quality fisheye at a very reasonable priceThere are many excellent reviews of this lens, but I just have to add my own experiences on a recent vacation.- Build quality is exceptional. Metal mount. It feels quite solid, the manual focus ring is a treat to use. The aperture ring is clicky enough without being difficult to move.- Optically... it's really quite nice. If you buy this lens, you should be fully aware of the geometric distortion a fisheye provides. Color fringing is present wide open if you look for it, but it's minimal and usually there is no need to worry about correcting it. Sharpness is very good even wide open.- It's all manual, all the time. No electrical contacts here of any sort; you must set your camera to shoot with no lens attached (often not the default). Your best bet is probably using aperture priority, where the camera body will adjust the shutter speed (and optionally ISO) automatically to provide the proper exposure.- Manual focusing is a breeze. For the most part I just leave it set to infinity; it's not often I need to refocus on something closer with this lens.- The built in lens hood is OK, but it makes the lens somewhat bulkier than it absolutely had to be. You can receive some flare if the sun is in the frame, and that's sometimes hard to avoid with a lens like this. The design does not allow for front filters, which is about the only truly negative thing I could say about the lens.You can pay a whole lot more for a Panasonic fisheye with full electronic capability, but there's really little point with a lens like this. Autofocus is really not required given the huge DOF, and shooting in aperture priority using the aperture ring on the lens is darned near foolproof.So, for value and quality, five stars and a hearty recommendation. Before you buy, though, note: this exact lens is available under several names, and there is no telling which will be the cheapest at any given time. Be sure to check out e.g. the Bower Ultra-Wide 7.5mm f/3.5 Fisheye Lens for Micro 4/3 SLY75BM43 and compare prices before you buy.5Wow! Amazing image quality!Wow, this really is an amazingly good fisheye lens. At the price it is even more incredible.First, the image quality: At F/5.6 it is razor sharp all the way into the extreme corners, at F/3.5 (wide open) it is razor sharp across almost the entire frame and is showing just the tiniest bit of softness (only visible at 200% really) in the extreme corners. I have to say, when I opened my test shots in Lightroom my jaw just about dropped, I really did not expect performance this good. There is a bit of red/cyan lateral chromatic aberration. This was easily handled in Lightroom with the CA slider and any modern image editor should have a similar control.Second, the build: It is a well constructed lens. Most of the body is high quality plastic. The mount and base of lens is metal (the silver part of the black lens) as is the red ring. The rest of the lens body is plastic. The lens cap is an effective latching design that holds itself by the hood petals. This is nicer than a friction fit design, but it does require orienting the lens cap when attaching. It is a surprisingly small lens. Check online reviews to get a feel for the relative size. The focus ring is nicely damped. The aperture ring has a good feel and distinct clicks. It is a very small lens, so it does require some care to not bump one ring while adjusting the other.Third, the price: Fisheyes twice this price and twice the size often don't perform as well as this lens. Samyang/Rokinon has been making some impressive and reasonably priced lenses recently and this one should be near the top for value and performance.Finally, some hopefully helpful details and clarifications.This is an equal area projection fisheye lens, like most every fisheye on the market. Samyang does make a 8mm APS-C fisheye which is unusual in that it uses a stereographic projection. There was some confusion on the web as to the projection of this new 7.5mm when it came out, but I've tested and measured it and it is a equal area projection. Check the Wikipedia article on "Fisheye lens" for details on the different kinds of fisheye projections (mappings).This is an entirely manual lens, manual aperture and manual focus. There are a number of such lenses appearing for the micro-four-thirds cameras, but if you are not familiar with using such a lens do your homework! Essentially you will control the aperture with a ring on the lens and you will always have to manual focus. On many cameras you'll have to enable a setting somewhere like "shoot without lens" to let the camera know you are using a lens that has no electrical connection to the camera. For a fisheye this is not a big deal, you rarely focus the lens as the depth of field is so large. Manual focus is also quite easy on most micro-four-thirds cameras as you can zoom in liveview to check focus.At the risk of stating the obvious - this is a 180 degree fisheye lens which makes it a "specialty" lens. You might find it odd to use and the novelty may wear off over time. However, there is another way to use this lens. Using software (both free and for purchase) you can "de-fish" the lens by applying a transform to the images you take with it. You can make it look like a 7.5mm recti-linear lens. As this lens is very sharp it actually works really well. You can find many examples of people doing this on the web. One issue, it becomes a bit hard to compose when doing this - a lot of what you see in the viewfinder will be clipped once you "de-fish" the image in post processing.Bottom line, if you've ever wanted a fisheye lens and you own a micro-four-thirds camera this is the lens to get!5Superb in every wayThe lens is actually made by Samyang, and like other Samyang-made lenses will probably show up under various brand names. Mine is the Rokinon brand, purchased here on Amazon. Samyang has made a number of other fairly exotic lens designs such as their highly regarded 35mm f/1.4 and 85mm f/1.4. All are similar in that they contain no electronics and therefore must be used in a completely manual mode. In the case of this 7.5mm fisheye in Micro Four Thirds mount this presents no problems whatever and I don't even regard it as any sort of shortcoming. MFT cameras like the Panasonic G series are perfectly suited to this sort of lens -- just set the camera to "No lens" in the menu and it will take care of exposure automatically, in existing light.My Panasonic G1 and G2 cameras even can make good use of electronic flash indoors with this fisheye lens, under certain circumstances. Obviously no accessory flash unit will actually cover 180 degrees corner to corner to match the fisheye lens, but when shooting the length of my living room with a Nissin Di466 flash unit made for Four Thirds cameras, which has a zoom head that will cover lenses as short as 12mm, enough light bounces around from the off-white walls and ceiling to provide pretty good overall exposure, just some darkening in the extreme corners.Some have complained about the difficulty of focusing this manual-focus lens. In fact this is a non-issue, since the depth of field is so enormous, even wide open, that focusing can simply be ignored. Leave it set at infinity, or just slightly "cracked" from the infinity setting, and you will be fine in practically all ordinary circumstances. In the Micro Four Thirds format, the depth of field of a 7.5mm lens at f/3.5 set at infinity is 3.55 ft to infinity. Stopped down to f/5.6, depth of field is 2.17 ft to infinity. Does anyone need a greater range of sharpness than that?The Rokinon 7.5mm fisheye does focus of course; it focuses down to 0.08 meters, a bit closer than 0.3 feet. That is actually closer than it probably sounds to most people, since focus distance is measured in the traditional and correct way -- from subject to focal plane, not subject to lens. At closest focusing distance the subject is about a couple of inches in front of the lens. Really, the whole notion of focusing is rather whimsical with this lens anyway, except I suppose in some unusual circumstances that I can't even imagine. For most users just leaving the focus at or very, very close to infinity will be the best thing to do in most ordinary usage. Trying to improve sharpness by fiddling with the focus ring is unlikely to improve anything and may make things less sharp. Consider -- the marked distance next to infinity on the focus ring is 0.25 ft. But at that distance setting and f/5.6 for example, calculated depth of field is only 0.23 ft to 0.28 ft. It would be nice if there were a mark for hyperfocal distance at some useful aperture, but again, such a mark would be very, very close to the infinity mark.Everything about the Rokinon bespeaks quality. Construction feels very solid and the finish is great. Focus and aperture rings turn smoothly but with plenty of damping so they won't be accidentally moved off chosen settings. Sharpness is simply superb from edge to edge. This isn't just the opinion of myself and other users; the German lens testing site photozone.de using sophisticated modulation transfer function testing equipment gives the Rokinon very high marks.I love fisheyes and have had one for every complete camera system I've owned since about 1975. This Rokinon is by far the least expensive one I've owned, but I have as much confidence in it as I've had for any of the others.Highly recommended.5Yes, a manual fisheye for an EVF camera is a GOOD thing.This is a very cool lens for not much money.Ok, I know what you're thinking... MANUAL lens, and FISHEYE? The 1970s called, they want their lens back!But no, seriously, this makes a ton of sense. First, the MANUAL part. This is a 7.5mm lens. There's a focus control, sure, but the depth of field is absurdly deep anyway... you will never want for autofocus on this lens. If you're at infinity and f3.5, you're in focus from about 3.5ft to infinity. If you move off infinity a bit to take advantage of your hyperfocal range, you get another foot or so. You can focus, but it's not needed for many shoots.Manual aperture you say... in fact, I do. But think about it for a second... you're not using an SLR, you're using an EVF camera. When you stop down, your EVF adjusts. So unlike the case on an SLR camera, you don't really see that the lens is stopped down, at least with the range of the AGC in your viewfinder. This is the main reason manual-only lenses are pretty popular for EVF cameras. Well, that, and video.Next up... FISHEYE? Ain't that the silly circle of distortion in the middle of the image thing? Well, you're half-correct. This is a full-frame fisheye, equivalent to a 15mm fisheye on a 35mm camera. Fisheye is in the design, not specifically the focal length. A wide-angle lens attempts to be rectilinear -- straight lines stay straight. That's expensive. A fisheye allows linear distortion, which is why everyone knows the "fisheye effect". Thing is, we actually do live in the 21rst century now... there are tools to de-fisheye a fisheye shot. Google up "de-fisheye"... there are three or four easy ways in Photoshop to change a fisheye shot into a wide angle shot, if you're not happy with the fisheye look. Meanwhile, you have 180-degree coverage... that's wider than the way more expensive 12mm non-fisheye I have on my full-frame Canon DSLR.The build quality on this is great... it might look a little like the plasticy Olympus m43 kit lenses, but's made of higher quality plastic and metal parts. The image quality is very good at f3.5 and excellent at f5.6.5
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