• Kenko Auto Extension Tube Set DG 12mm, 20mm, and 36mm Tubes for Nikon AF Digital and Film Cameras - AEXRUBEDGN
Kenko Auto Extension Tube Set DG 12mm, 20mm, and 36mm Tubes for Nikon AF Digital and Film Cameras - AEXRUBEDGN

Kenko Auto Extension Tube Set DG 12mm, 20mm, and 36mm Tubes for Nikon AF Digital and Film Cameras - AEXRUBEDGN

SKU:HA0JG88JU
Sale price
SG$ 298.00
Regular price
SG$ 496.00
Unit price
per 
( 39% off )
Quantity:
Expected Delivery: 21-28 days

Tracked Shipping

Secure Payments

10 Days Return

Tracked Shipping

Secure Payments

10 Days Return

  • Designed to enable a lens to focus closer than its normal set
  • Very Useful for Macro Photography
  • The Extension Tubes have no optics
  • Focus Closer to the objects you see and enjoy the feel of photography
  • Auto Extension Tube Set for the Nikon AF Mount
  • Supported Sensor Size APS-C, Full Frame

Customer Reviews

Not perfect, but overall a great product. Only 4 stars because when all 3 rings are attached, auto-focus doesn't work well. Each individual ring has a separate electrical contact; combining more creates a higher resistance connection, so it seems as if when all 3 are on, there's not enough voltage to drive the focus motor. With 1 ring, it works effortlessly; with 2 rings it's starting to struggle but is manageable. Other than that, this tool helps to capture excellent macro photos for the price. 4Needs Too Much External Light and Focusing Depth is Very Narrow I was anxious to get these extension tubes to enable me to get closer to my subjects. Upon using them and talking to Kenko customer support, I didn't completely understand the workings of extension tubes. I use a Nikon D850 and for lighting I was using two Nikon SB-910 in soft boxes. What I immediately noticed is that you have to get extremely close to your subject, you need a ton of light and focusing is tough. The D850 when using live-view and manual focus you see a red outline around the areas in focus. When using any of the tubes the area of focus is extremely narrow and could be easily missed. It may only be a tiny single point. Even if shooting with speed lights at full power the exposures are dark. These points were confirmed by the Kenko rep. He suggested that a ring light should be used. So with these points working against me, I'm returning them. The build quality seems OK but they mostly made of plastic. So if you're interested in getting extension tubes, please understand their limitations of lighting and focus. My rating is based on that their use is problematic but if you had the right gear, they would likely work just fine. 3A great stepping stone into macro photography A great stepping stone into macro photography. This product is by no means a substitute for a macro lens. It works by altering the minimum focusing distance. IE: if you have a lens where you need to be at least 1.5 feet away from the subject before it has the ability to focus, by adding a tube, you can get as close as a couple inches away. However, there are limitations to this. For one, it means you HAVE to be super close for anything to be in focus. I find myself leaving the focus near infinity and moving myself or the subject a mm at a time. I recommend a tripod for macro work since breathing will change the focal plane. I still really want a 100mm lens, but I'm able to experiment with macro first (and see if I even like it). Another drawback to consider is light: the longer the barrel of a lens, the more light needed. Adding tubes not only lengthens the barrel, but the closer you get to your subject (ie 3"away), the more light is blocked out. I understand more why macro photographers use ring flashes. included a bunch of photos. These would be good for someone who doesn't want to spend thousands on a macro lens, but want to get the occasional macro shot, like if you are a budding wedding photographer and only need a macro for ring shots. Another drawback to consider is light: the longer the barrel of a lens, the more light needed. Adding tubes not only lengthens the barrel, but the closer you get to your subject (ie 3"away), the more light is blocked out. I understand more why macro photographers use ring flashes. 4Solid, easy to use, work great I bought these in part because I switched to a full-frame camera, making my Tamron 90mm macro lens considerably less useful. So far I have used them with the Tamron 90mm macro (12mm extension) to make it a functional macro lens for insects again, and with the Canon 300mm F/4 (36mm). I almost always shoot handheld, using a flash for closeup macro but not with the long lens.The macro + 12mm extension is a great combination, making it possible to again use the macro lens for larger subjects. Autofocus still works fine, although I don't always use it for macro, depending on what I'm photographing. The 300mm F/4 + 36mm extension is a perfect dragonfly setup for most species, allowing me to get close enough to fill the frame on larger species. Again, autofocus works fine, as does aperture (unlike with macro, where I usually use f8 or f11, I use a variety of apertures for dragonflies) I haven't yet tried stacking more than one extension tube, but expect that will allow me to get closer to damselflies and small dragonflies, while still retaining more working distance than I would get with a macro lens.I haven't yet tried the extension tubes with my 35mm reverse macro set, but I will soon. The Kenko tubes are solid and slip on and off easily, and seem to be well-made. The one potential issue is that it is possible to bump the release lever if you're not careful. It's unlikely that the lens will fall off, but it's a good idea to be careful and aware of the possibility.Honestly, I didn't fully understand the purpose of extension tubes before I got them, but now I wouldn't go without them. They're incredibly useful. Just be aware that they function by *reducing your working distance*. If you want to magnify more without getting closer to your subject, you want extenders/teleconverters or diopter filters, not extension tubes. If you want a large depth of field with your subject sharp all the way through...no lens or extension tubes will give you that, but you might want to google "focus stacking" (it's a physics problem). If you are ONLY planning to do reverse macro, where you lose autofocus and control the aperture via a manual aperture ring, you don't need the electronics in these and can buy much cheaper, electronics-free extension tubes. 5Excellent addition to any macro photographers toolkit albeit slightly expensive The Kenko Macro Automatic Extension Tube Set for Canon EOS is a set of 3 extension tubes that you can mix and match to give you different levels of "magnification" (more on this in a bit). You get 12mm, 20mm and 36mm tubes that you can use singly or mix and match to give you a maximum of 68mm.Extension tubes do not contain any glass/optics and are designed to enable a lens to focus closer than its normal minimum focusing distance. As such they effectively magnify your subject. The extension tubes are mounted between your lens and the camera body to create more distance between the lens and your sensor. By moving the lens further away from the camera sensor, the lens is forced to focus much closer than normal and your image is essentially cropped. The greater the length of the extension tube, the closer the lens can focus. Basically the sensor captures a smaller amount of the image with the rest of the image being outside of the sensor.You have to take into account the focal length of your lens when applying extension tubes. For example, if you have one of the 50mm Canon primes, you cannot use the full 68mm of the extension tubes as you will never be able to focus the object.I done a great deal of research into extension tubes and which ones to get before deciding to go with the Kenko Automatic tubes. The automatic part of the Kenko set is that each tube has a series of connectors which relay information from the camera to your lens and vice vera. Thus all the EXIF data is passed on, auto focus, aperture etc. all work just as if the lens was connected directly to your camera.The Kenko tubes work with both APS-C and full size cameras and lenses (basically EF (Full Frame) and EF-S (APS-C) lenses).I've tried out a variety of lenses with this Kenko set including but not limited to 18-135 EFS, 70-300EF and 100L EF Macro lens. All the lenses I have tried have worked without problem. I have even used this extension set along with a Metabones III adapter to on my Sony A7 full frame again without incident.By giving you three separate extension tubes you have much greater flexibility in the amount of magnification you desire and working with a proper macro lens (e.g. Canon EF100L 2.8 USM Macro) you can get extremely close into a subject. You can however use these lenses to turn a non-macro lens into a sort-of macro if you don't want to spend the money specifically on a macro lens (if you are interested in macro photography you really do need a specific macro lens). For example I used these extension tubes with my 70-300mm lens to get some quite detailed and sharp images of flowers and insects.When shooting macro, you have a very narrow depth of field and it is also harder to keep a subject in perfect focus (a tripod really is a must). Using extension magnifies these effects.The only downside to the Kenko set of extension tubes if the price. They are well constructed, fit tightly and work very well but I still think $200 is a little much when all they really are is a set of tubes and connecters (no optics).Overall a great addition to a macro photographers toolkit and I carry these around in my camera bag everywhere I go. 5Even better than what I expected in both quality and capability. I'm quite impressed with what these tubes allow me to accomplish. Like everyone else here I'm interested in Macro photography, but wasn't willing to spend the money necessary for a real macro lens. So I thought these would fit the bill for my level of interest and budget. I'm really happy to say they are even better than expected. Quality-wise they seem really solid and well made. Certainly not the same standard of a Canon lens, but what I would expect at this price-point for sure. Using a Canon 5DmkII with the ES-F50mm f1.4 lens I'm able to get right up against my subject and still be in sharp focus. The negatives as far as I can see is the barrel distortion of the extension, esp. the 36mm one isn't easily corrected by Adobe Camera RAW or Lightroom, and it seems to really accentuate the chromatic aberration of the lens, but for the price difference I think its a worthwhile trade off. I did a little test to give you an idea of what you can expect from your subject size-wise. I took a photo of a familiar object first without the extensions, and then just the 12mm tube, the 20mm and the 36mm so you can get an idea of what's possible. Each were photographed at the closest focus range, moving the camera as necessary to match. 5Works great with long lenses I find that the Kenko Extension tubes work as described. I originally purchased the Canon version of the extension tubes but found the 12mm not useful enough to keep at the price I paid for it. I then purchased the Kenko version and really cannot tell any difference in build quality from the Canon version. Since my use of these tubes is a little different than most, I wanted to share my experience in case someone else had the same thoughts and concerns. While I do use these tubes on my 50mm lens, my primary use is with my Canon 300 mm 4.0L and my 400 mm 5.6L lenses. While none of the lenses I have are specifically macro lenses, my 300 mm and 400 mm have always taken spectacular close-up shots of small items. So my main concern is whether or not these tubes would fit snugly with my large and heavy lenses and would the construction of the Kenko tubes cause damage to my camera or lenses due to the weight of the lenses. I am happy to report that the extension tubes do fit snugly to my camera and all of my lenses. Obviously, I do not leave the tubes and my long lenses attached when not actively shooting, but I am not concerned that the extra weight of the long lenses will cause damage while shooting. The construction of these tubes is pretty solid and on par with the Canon version of these tubes. 5Best Bang for Your Buck! These are some of the best extension tubes I've used. The do allow electronic communication between your lens and the camera which is nice, but autofocus is a bit messy which is to be expected. Overall the build quality is superb for the price and they haven't failed me yet!I've used a few other brands of extension tubes that cost less but then end up not working well or breaking or getting stuck to your lens!!!!If you are on a budget I wouldn't suggest going with anything less than these!Attached is a photo I took with my Canon 6D and Rokinon 85/1.2 Cine lens with the 36mm adapter. 5Good Option and Great Price The extension tubes do what I expected and allow me to get macro close shots with my DSLR. The connections are not the smoothest when rotating the tube onto the camera but they still attach correctly and work fine. Also, the thumb tab to click the release if just a metal tab sticking out of the side and not as nice as a feel as the Canon brand thumb button-tab. The mounting bayonets are metal so I am not worried about longevity as I would have been with other brands made using plastic, Since there is no glass in the tubes they don't degrade my lenses at all but the auto focus does not work as well as I would like so I just focus manually.All three of the tubes in this set cost less than one Canon branch tube. Since they do not degrade my lenses and work for the frequency I need them, they proved to be a good choice for me. If I had to use them daily I would probably go with the Canon brand name. 4Awesome tubes! You will be able to get super close to your subjects but focus is very sensitive -use a tripod & remote shutter I am a serious hobbyist photographer. I have never made a full-time living doing photography (but I have had sporadic periods of good part-time/freelance income). I currently shoot on a Canon 6D and this is my first foray into macro photography. I first started with magnification filters, but I could not figure out how to get tack-sharp focus with them. They did enlarge nicely so the blur could have been user error. Anyway, I read about extension tubes while trying to research my blur problem.After a quick Google about extension tubes, I found the Kenko tubes. Reviews looked favorable so I ordered. I am really glad that I did. These tubes are pricier than most of the others on Amazon, but after reading reviews about tubes breaking and getting stuck in the camera/on the lens (or lenses being to heavy and breaking away from the plastic tubes) I didn't want to cheap out.These tubes are just hollow plastic tubes. They connect to the camera on one end (just like your lenses do) and to the lens of your choice on the other end. Basically, the tubes put distance between your lens and the mirror of your camera. You can use all of the included tubes (3 of them) together or any combination you choose. At first, I tried this with my 14mm wide angle lens. I never got it to work....I only saw black even with the camera pointed towards the sun in full daylight. After I Googled the problem, I came to the conclusion that you can not go too small or it doesn't work (I never tried it again with the 14mm). Next, I tried it with my nifty fifty and it was soooo exciting. It worked!You have to been close up to your subject to focus...if you try to dial in something across the room with the tubes installed all you will see is blur. Put something right in front of it and it will pop into view. I did find out very quickly that I would not be able to hand hold the camera and get sharp shots very often. A flash could help (even in broad daylight) possibly, but I didn't want to use one. Instead, I opted to use longer exposures to get the pictures. My 50mm usually requires about 1.5 feet to focus but with all of the extension tubes tacked on, I was able to get within an inch of my subject. The area in focus using my setup was very slim...if the camera move half a millimeter I lost the focus. If the wind blew the flower, I lost the focus. If I swayed with the camera, I lost the focus. Basically, the field of focus is VERY narrow (I will practice more and try wider apertures to hopefully remedy this).I have a full size semi-professional tripod. It can not get any closer to the ground than about 2 feet. This is way to far of a distance for my camera to focus with the tubes installed (think a couple of inches at most from your subject...not feet). To get the camera closer to the ground and my subjects (ants and flowers) I attached an articulating arm to a cheaper, smaller tripod and added a small ball head. I was able to bend it, adjust it and rotate it until I could focus on my subject. I frankensteined it together and it was awkward because sometimes the camera would end up completely upside down and I was trying to compose through the viewfinder (next time I plan to attach my tablet to use as a monitor).This is my first experience using the Kenko's. I think things will only go up from here! I did just receive a macro focusing rail in the mail today and I am waiting for a macro tripod to be delivered this week also. I think with the right equipment I can get truly stunning results. I think that if you are a beginner macro enthusiast like me, you should definitely get these to learn with before dropping $800-$1200 on a dedicated macro lens. I would also recommend that you buy a mini tripod (one that can get on the ground level or practically ground level) if you plan to capture things that are low. Also different lenses will allow you to be farther away and use these. My last tip would be to use a wireless remote to release the shutter (or wired shutter release) or your cameras timer to release the shutter. This will reduce camera movement and picture blur. I also tried a few shots with my kit lens and the images were fine. I really like these tubes and I would purchase them again. I would also recommend these to a friend. I am attaching the pictures that I took on my first time out with these tubes. No previous experience so blame me, not the tubes for any ugly blur ;) Narrow depth of field is great though, in my humble opinion. 4
See All Reviews
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.sg, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Description
  • Designed to enable a lens to focus closer than its normal set
  • Very Useful for Macro Photography
  • The Extension Tubes have no optics
  • Focus Closer to the objects you see and enjoy the feel of photography
  • Auto Extension Tube Set for the Nikon AF Mount
  • Supported Sensor Size APS-C, Full Frame
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Not perfect, but overall a great product. Only 4 stars because when all 3 rings are attached, auto-focus doesn't work well. Each individual ring has a separate electrical contact; combining more creates a higher resistance connection, so it seems as if when all 3 are on, there's not enough voltage to drive the focus motor. With 1 ring, it works effortlessly; with 2 rings it's starting to struggle but is manageable. Other than that, this tool helps to capture excellent macro photos for the price. 4Needs Too Much External Light and Focusing Depth is Very Narrow I was anxious to get these extension tubes to enable me to get closer to my subjects. Upon using them and talking to Kenko customer support, I didn't completely understand the workings of extension tubes. I use a Nikon D850 and for lighting I was using two Nikon SB-910 in soft boxes. What I immediately noticed is that you have to get extremely close to your subject, you need a ton of light and focusing is tough. The D850 when using live-view and manual focus you see a red outline around the areas in focus. When using any of the tubes the area of focus is extremely narrow and could be easily missed. It may only be a tiny single point. Even if shooting with speed lights at full power the exposures are dark. These points were confirmed by the Kenko rep. He suggested that a ring light should be used. So with these points working against me, I'm returning them. The build quality seems OK but they mostly made of plastic. So if you're interested in getting extension tubes, please understand their limitations of lighting and focus. My rating is based on that their use is problematic but if you had the right gear, they would likely work just fine. 3A great stepping stone into macro photography A great stepping stone into macro photography. This product is by no means a substitute for a macro lens. It works by altering the minimum focusing distance. IE: if you have a lens where you need to be at least 1.5 feet away from the subject before it has the ability to focus, by adding a tube, you can get as close as a couple inches away. However, there are limitations to this. For one, it means you HAVE to be super close for anything to be in focus. I find myself leaving the focus near infinity and moving myself or the subject a mm at a time. I recommend a tripod for macro work since breathing will change the focal plane. I still really want a 100mm lens, but I'm able to experiment with macro first (and see if I even like it). Another drawback to consider is light: the longer the barrel of a lens, the more light needed. Adding tubes not only lengthens the barrel, but the closer you get to your subject (ie 3"away), the more light is blocked out. I understand more why macro photographers use ring flashes. included a bunch of photos. These would be good for someone who doesn't want to spend thousands on a macro lens, but want to get the occasional macro shot, like if you are a budding wedding photographer and only need a macro for ring shots. Another drawback to consider is light: the longer the barrel of a lens, the more light needed. Adding tubes not only lengthens the barrel, but the closer you get to your subject (ie 3"away), the more light is blocked out. I understand more why macro photographers use ring flashes. 4Solid, easy to use, work great I bought these in part because I switched to a full-frame camera, making my Tamron 90mm macro lens considerably less useful. So far I have used them with the Tamron 90mm macro (12mm extension) to make it a functional macro lens for insects again, and with the Canon 300mm F/4 (36mm). I almost always shoot handheld, using a flash for closeup macro but not with the long lens.The macro + 12mm extension is a great combination, making it possible to again use the macro lens for larger subjects. Autofocus still works fine, although I don't always use it for macro, depending on what I'm photographing. The 300mm F/4 + 36mm extension is a perfect dragonfly setup for most species, allowing me to get close enough to fill the frame on larger species. Again, autofocus works fine, as does aperture (unlike with macro, where I usually use f8 or f11, I use a variety of apertures for dragonflies) I haven't yet tried stacking more than one extension tube, but expect that will allow me to get closer to damselflies and small dragonflies, while still retaining more working distance than I would get with a macro lens.I haven't yet tried the extension tubes with my 35mm reverse macro set, but I will soon. The Kenko tubes are solid and slip on and off easily, and seem to be well-made. The one potential issue is that it is possible to bump the release lever if you're not careful. It's unlikely that the lens will fall off, but it's a good idea to be careful and aware of the possibility.Honestly, I didn't fully understand the purpose of extension tubes before I got them, but now I wouldn't go without them. They're incredibly useful. Just be aware that they function by *reducing your working distance*. If you want to magnify more without getting closer to your subject, you want extenders/teleconverters or diopter filters, not extension tubes. If you want a large depth of field with your subject sharp all the way through...no lens or extension tubes will give you that, but you might want to google "focus stacking" (it's a physics problem). If you are ONLY planning to do reverse macro, where you lose autofocus and control the aperture via a manual aperture ring, you don't need the electronics in these and can buy much cheaper, electronics-free extension tubes. 5Excellent addition to any macro photographers toolkit albeit slightly expensive The Kenko Macro Automatic Extension Tube Set for Canon EOS is a set of 3 extension tubes that you can mix and match to give you different levels of "magnification" (more on this in a bit). You get 12mm, 20mm and 36mm tubes that you can use singly or mix and match to give you a maximum of 68mm.Extension tubes do not contain any glass/optics and are designed to enable a lens to focus closer than its normal minimum focusing distance. As such they effectively magnify your subject. The extension tubes are mounted between your lens and the camera body to create more distance between the lens and your sensor. By moving the lens further away from the camera sensor, the lens is forced to focus much closer than normal and your image is essentially cropped. The greater the length of the extension tube, the closer the lens can focus. Basically the sensor captures a smaller amount of the image with the rest of the image being outside of the sensor.You have to take into account the focal length of your lens when applying extension tubes. For example, if you have one of the 50mm Canon primes, you cannot use the full 68mm of the extension tubes as you will never be able to focus the object.I done a great deal of research into extension tubes and which ones to get before deciding to go with the Kenko Automatic tubes. The automatic part of the Kenko set is that each tube has a series of connectors which relay information from the camera to your lens and vice vera. Thus all the EXIF data is passed on, auto focus, aperture etc. all work just as if the lens was connected directly to your camera.The Kenko tubes work with both APS-C and full size cameras and lenses (basically EF (Full Frame) and EF-S (APS-C) lenses).I've tried out a variety of lenses with this Kenko set including but not limited to 18-135 EFS, 70-300EF and 100L EF Macro lens. All the lenses I have tried have worked without problem. I have even used this extension set along with a Metabones III adapter to on my Sony A7 full frame again without incident.By giving you three separate extension tubes you have much greater flexibility in the amount of magnification you desire and working with a proper macro lens (e.g. Canon EF100L 2.8 USM Macro) you can get extremely close into a subject. You can however use these lenses to turn a non-macro lens into a sort-of macro if you don't want to spend the money specifically on a macro lens (if you are interested in macro photography you really do need a specific macro lens). For example I used these extension tubes with my 70-300mm lens to get some quite detailed and sharp images of flowers and insects.When shooting macro, you have a very narrow depth of field and it is also harder to keep a subject in perfect focus (a tripod really is a must). Using extension magnifies these effects.The only downside to the Kenko set of extension tubes if the price. They are well constructed, fit tightly and work very well but I still think $200 is a little much when all they really are is a set of tubes and connecters (no optics).Overall a great addition to a macro photographers toolkit and I carry these around in my camera bag everywhere I go. 5Even better than what I expected in both quality and capability. I'm quite impressed with what these tubes allow me to accomplish. Like everyone else here I'm interested in Macro photography, but wasn't willing to spend the money necessary for a real macro lens. So I thought these would fit the bill for my level of interest and budget. I'm really happy to say they are even better than expected. Quality-wise they seem really solid and well made. Certainly not the same standard of a Canon lens, but what I would expect at this price-point for sure. Using a Canon 5DmkII with the ES-F50mm f1.4 lens I'm able to get right up against my subject and still be in sharp focus. The negatives as far as I can see is the barrel distortion of the extension, esp. the 36mm one isn't easily corrected by Adobe Camera RAW or Lightroom, and it seems to really accentuate the chromatic aberration of the lens, but for the price difference I think its a worthwhile trade off. I did a little test to give you an idea of what you can expect from your subject size-wise. I took a photo of a familiar object first without the extensions, and then just the 12mm tube, the 20mm and the 36mm so you can get an idea of what's possible. Each were photographed at the closest focus range, moving the camera as necessary to match. 5Works great with long lenses I find that the Kenko Extension tubes work as described. I originally purchased the Canon version of the extension tubes but found the 12mm not useful enough to keep at the price I paid for it. I then purchased the Kenko version and really cannot tell any difference in build quality from the Canon version. Since my use of these tubes is a little different than most, I wanted to share my experience in case someone else had the same thoughts and concerns. While I do use these tubes on my 50mm lens, my primary use is with my Canon 300 mm 4.0L and my 400 mm 5.6L lenses. While none of the lenses I have are specifically macro lenses, my 300 mm and 400 mm have always taken spectacular close-up shots of small items. So my main concern is whether or not these tubes would fit snugly with my large and heavy lenses and would the construction of the Kenko tubes cause damage to my camera or lenses due to the weight of the lenses. I am happy to report that the extension tubes do fit snugly to my camera and all of my lenses. Obviously, I do not leave the tubes and my long lenses attached when not actively shooting, but I am not concerned that the extra weight of the long lenses will cause damage while shooting. The construction of these tubes is pretty solid and on par with the Canon version of these tubes. 5Best Bang for Your Buck! These are some of the best extension tubes I've used. The do allow electronic communication between your lens and the camera which is nice, but autofocus is a bit messy which is to be expected. Overall the build quality is superb for the price and they haven't failed me yet!I've used a few other brands of extension tubes that cost less but then end up not working well or breaking or getting stuck to your lens!!!!If you are on a budget I wouldn't suggest going with anything less than these!Attached is a photo I took with my Canon 6D and Rokinon 85/1.2 Cine lens with the 36mm adapter. 5Good Option and Great Price The extension tubes do what I expected and allow me to get macro close shots with my DSLR. The connections are not the smoothest when rotating the tube onto the camera but they still attach correctly and work fine. Also, the thumb tab to click the release if just a metal tab sticking out of the side and not as nice as a feel as the Canon brand thumb button-tab. The mounting bayonets are metal so I am not worried about longevity as I would have been with other brands made using plastic, Since there is no glass in the tubes they don't degrade my lenses at all but the auto focus does not work as well as I would like so I just focus manually.All three of the tubes in this set cost less than one Canon branch tube. Since they do not degrade my lenses and work for the frequency I need them, they proved to be a good choice for me. If I had to use them daily I would probably go with the Canon brand name. 4Awesome tubes! You will be able to get super close to your subjects but focus is very sensitive -use a tripod & remote shutter I am a serious hobbyist photographer. I have never made a full-time living doing photography (but I have had sporadic periods of good part-time/freelance income). I currently shoot on a Canon 6D and this is my first foray into macro photography. I first started with magnification filters, but I could not figure out how to get tack-sharp focus with them. They did enlarge nicely so the blur could have been user error. Anyway, I read about extension tubes while trying to research my blur problem.After a quick Google about extension tubes, I found the Kenko tubes. Reviews looked favorable so I ordered. I am really glad that I did. These tubes are pricier than most of the others on Amazon, but after reading reviews about tubes breaking and getting stuck in the camera/on the lens (or lenses being to heavy and breaking away from the plastic tubes) I didn't want to cheap out.These tubes are just hollow plastic tubes. They connect to the camera on one end (just like your lenses do) and to the lens of your choice on the other end. Basically, the tubes put distance between your lens and the mirror of your camera. You can use all of the included tubes (3 of them) together or any combination you choose. At first, I tried this with my 14mm wide angle lens. I never got it to work....I only saw black even with the camera pointed towards the sun in full daylight. After I Googled the problem, I came to the conclusion that you can not go too small or it doesn't work (I never tried it again with the 14mm). Next, I tried it with my nifty fifty and it was soooo exciting. It worked!You have to been close up to your subject to focus...if you try to dial in something across the room with the tubes installed all you will see is blur. Put something right in front of it and it will pop into view. I did find out very quickly that I would not be able to hand hold the camera and get sharp shots very often. A flash could help (even in broad daylight) possibly, but I didn't want to use one. Instead, I opted to use longer exposures to get the pictures. My 50mm usually requires about 1.5 feet to focus but with all of the extension tubes tacked on, I was able to get within an inch of my subject. The area in focus using my setup was very slim...if the camera move half a millimeter I lost the focus. If the wind blew the flower, I lost the focus. If I swayed with the camera, I lost the focus. Basically, the field of focus is VERY narrow (I will practice more and try wider apertures to hopefully remedy this).I have a full size semi-professional tripod. It can not get any closer to the ground than about 2 feet. This is way to far of a distance for my camera to focus with the tubes installed (think a couple of inches at most from your subject...not feet). To get the camera closer to the ground and my subjects (ants and flowers) I attached an articulating arm to a cheaper, smaller tripod and added a small ball head. I was able to bend it, adjust it and rotate it until I could focus on my subject. I frankensteined it together and it was awkward because sometimes the camera would end up completely upside down and I was trying to compose through the viewfinder (next time I plan to attach my tablet to use as a monitor).This is my first experience using the Kenko's. I think things will only go up from here! I did just receive a macro focusing rail in the mail today and I am waiting for a macro tripod to be delivered this week also. I think with the right equipment I can get truly stunning results. I think that if you are a beginner macro enthusiast like me, you should definitely get these to learn with before dropping $800-$1200 on a dedicated macro lens. I would also recommend that you buy a mini tripod (one that can get on the ground level or practically ground level) if you plan to capture things that are low. Also different lenses will allow you to be farther away and use these. My last tip would be to use a wireless remote to release the shutter (or wired shutter release) or your cameras timer to release the shutter. This will reduce camera movement and picture blur. I also tried a few shots with my kit lens and the images were fine. I really like these tubes and I would purchase them again. I would also recommend these to a friend. I am attaching the pictures that I took on my first time out with these tubes. No previous experience so blame me, not the tubes for any ugly blur ;) Narrow depth of field is great though, in my humble opinion. 4
See All Reviews
Return And Refund Policy
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Delivery Policy
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.

Recently Viewed

BACK TO TOP