• Channel Master Advantage 60 Directional Outdoor TV Antenna - Long Range FM, VHF, UHF and Digital HDTV Aerial - CM-3018
  • Channel Master Advantage 60 Directional Outdoor TV Antenna - Long Range FM, VHF, UHF and Digital HDTV Aerial - CM-3018
Channel Master Advantage 60 Directional Outdoor TV Antenna - Long Range FM, VHF, UHF and Digital HDTV Aerial - CM-3018
Channel Master Advantage 60 Directional Outdoor TV Antenna - Long Range FM, VHF, UHF and Digital HDTV Aerial - CM-3018

Channel Master Advantage 60 Directional Outdoor TV Antenna - Long Range FM, VHF, UHF and Digital HDTV Aerial - CM-3018

SKU:HA0SAKJ4Y
Sale price
SG$ 588.00
Regular price
SG$ 980.00
Unit price
per 
( 40% off )
Quantity:
Expected Delivery: 21-28 days

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  • LONG RANGE RECEPTION: 60 Miles (with an amplifier and increased installation height, a longer reception range can be achieved. In comparison tests, the CM-3018 has outperformed other outdoor tv antennas claiming reception ranges of 80+ miles)
  • OPTIMIZED FOR ALL CHANNELS: Designed to pick up Low VHF, High VHF, UHF and FM frequencies from all broadcasters including CBS, FOX, ABC, NBC, PBS, Univision, Telemundo and more. Will also support ATSC 3.0 and 4K broadcast when available.
  • RELIABLE HIGH GAIN PERFORMANCE: 8.2 dB (VHF), 8.4 dB (UHF)
  • TRUSTED QUALITY: Channel Master has been manufacturing antennas since 1949 offering best of class warranty & support. Constructed of high quality materials, Channel Master antennas are designed to withstand even the most extreme outdoor conditions.
  • EASY TO INSTALL: The antenna includes U-bolt mounting hardware which can be used to attach the antenna to a pole or mast and a step-by-step installation guide. [Note: Mast and Coaxial Cable Sold Separately]
  • Reception Range: Channels 2 thru 69 up to 60 miles
  • Picks up UHF, VHF, FM and HD
  • Easy Installation
  • Number of Elements: 30
  • Optimized for HDTV and Digital FM Signals

Customer Reviews

Happy non cable guy.I purchased an Omni directional antenna before this, that was rated 75 miles, and all channels were pixilated so bad I had to return it and go back to cable. I was hesitant to buy this believing I would get the same results.The cable company I had just went all digital, which they advertised weeks ahead of time.I awoke March 7th to find all my channels scrambled and was told I would have rent a cable box for each tv that I have.That information was never released in their notifications.At that point I was finished with paying for bad cable service.I mounted this antenna at height of 19ft.I connected it to the original cable installed by the cable company and got only 16 of the 19 local channels some what clear.I pulled the cable company's cable and installed all new R6 quad shield cable that I purchased when I got the antenna.I now get all 19 channels available in my area crystal clear at full 1080p compared to the 480p-720p the cable company was charging me for.It's like the difference between DVD and 4k UHD on my 4k UHD tv.My nearest channel is at 31.8mi and the furthest is 36.6Extremely happy with my purchase and will never deal with the cable company again.Note! The instructions for this antenna are pretty much worthless. 5Arrived damaged, 12 feet long!When I opened the box, I was disappointed. The antenna was bent! This antenna IS NOT packed correctly for shipping. It just floats in the box, ready to bend as soon as the box gets any rough treatment. There is no protection whatsoever in the box.I was also surprised at how big this antenna is. The picture doesn't show that this antenna is 12 feet long! You know when you're driving out in the country, and you see someone with a GIANT antenna on their roof? It's probably this one.I set up the antenna anyway. I'm about 35 miles from the towers that I want to receive, but I keep my antenna in my attic, and the tiny antenna that I bought last summer just didn't work with the roof covered in snow. After filling half of my attic with this antenna, (and removing three of the splitters that the previous owners left in the cable line,) I now have crystal-clear skip-less reception in the dead of a snowy winter!A few tips:- Look at some of the smaller Channel Master antennas. This one is 12 feet long!- Once you extend out the antenna, it's impossible to collapse.- Remove all the splitters from your TV cableRated 3 stars because of the packaging, and because it's hard to see via Amazon that it's 12 feet long. What would make me rate this 5 stars?- Package this correctly! A little bit of molded cardboard would go a long way, and is fully recyclable & biodegradable.- The amazon listing needs to make this antenna's giant size much more obvious.- It needs to be easier to collapse the antenna. I don't think I can ever remove it from my attic without destroying it. 3The BestLet me save you the headache. The gain of 8.5db is under rated. This is the best antenna. Beats antennas that are 50in longer. I have tried 8 of the top rated antennas and this channell master pulled in channels over 120 miles as crow flys. Ironically works better for me without any amps on 3 TVs. Trick is one piece of coax RG6U don't use old school r59. If you install your own cons make sure your not grounding it out even one tiny strand hitting feed kills the signal. I used a Klien pro compression tool on ideal cons that fit perfectly in the tool. I tried the x-/:reme 200 in long monster had 4 less channels on the UHF side. Tried the "stacker" from Dennie's Antenna at over $300 but not like this signal strength is higher across the spectrum. Make sure you ground antenna to an 8ft electrical ground rod. Adds lightning protection and a ground plain for reception. Ground the mast not the antenna. Also make sure minimum 10ft off the highest point of your roof. cheers! 5Not what I expected from Channel Master.Having been an owner and installer for a television antenna sales company, I have some experience with antennas. (It was many years ago) It seems obvious to me that Channel Master did not manufacture this antenna. It appears (exactly) the same as an RCA antenna and the quality is nothing like the old Crossfire and Quantum antennas CM used to make. I believe, if my memory serves me, I used to be able to get these, made by a company called antenna craft , or something similar. I did some measurements and it seems like even the elements are just manufactured to just "look right" as compared to actually being cut to half or even quarter wave frequency length . Before I bought this antenna , I simply put up a piece of scrap PVC pipe with a balun at the Tee in the middle, and stripped twelve gauge copper, cut to the length of channel 7 half wave. ( two quarter wave lengths) I could not get channel 4 which I wanted. Even when I cut a halt wave length for channel 4, I still was not successful. So I bought this. I Still don't get channel four, and the other channels come in just about the same as the home made antenna, with the exception of now getting channel 62 which I did not get with my previous Home made. Fortunately for me, all my channels come from the same direction with relation to my location. My home-made was not designed for UHF, but since 21 AND 33 are strong and close, I still got them. All of that said, location of any antenna is much more important than the actual antenna. Keeping the coax as short as feasible and not adding any splitters is also a must, unless you plan to add amplification. Rarely will amplification make any difference except to over come line and split loss. Experience also tells me that the usual best spot for a home antenna is ten to twenty feet above a roof peak and pointing at the horizon in the direction of the signal with as few trees and hills in between as possible.This is not a quality antenna, but if you do not have a lot of obstructions in the way, this will likely do a decent job for you, but you might do just as well with rabbit ears in your attic, depending on the signal strength where you are. This is a poorly built and cheap antenna which can be found in many stores with other names. It is Radio Shack quality.Perhaps Wineguard still makes their own antennas, ( I don't know) in which case, for the money and quality, I would choose one of their platinum VHF UHF HD antennas over this. The number 8200 is one they used to use but I have no idea if the quality is the same as it used to be.This is the first antenna I have bought in many years and it is nothing like what used to be manufactured under the CM name when Joe Resnick was in Ellenville. I can assure you, I won't buy another Channel Master product. They seem to be using only the name with no concern for quality. 2Warranty called me within a short time of sending request, very helpful, but read my Update on the antennaThe antenna is rated for 60 miles, so you have to wonder what RCA was doing when they rated the other antenna that is a fraction of the size for 70 miles. I think they stretched the truth a bit. This antenna is huge, you won't want to assemble it in the house, do it in your driveway.Advice: use a aluminum anti oxidation compound that you can get in a Home Depot, or on Amazon, it is a paste that you put on the parts that connect together, then slide them together and wipe off any that squeezes out. I cover both parts, the pipe it goes into, and the part that goes into the pipe. There are two places like this, an if you do this correctly, the antenna can always be taken down and disassembled. if you don't do it, the parts will oxidize and become one, and very difficult to get apart, and probably ruined when you do get them apart.This antenna for 60 miles is 9 feet 4 inches long, and 7 feet 6 inches wide when assembled.If you live within 40 miles of most TV stations, you don't need an antenna this big. Also, the height above all around you will determine how well any antenna will work. If you put it in your attic, and have a metal roof, it won't work at all in your attic. If you don't have a metal roof, the attic is the last place to put it, but in a suburb of a big city, you may get good results in your attic. It all depends on where the Tv stations are. The bigger the antenna, the more gain it has. Gain is the amount of amplification the antenna will offer with nothing else but coax attached to it.There are distribution amplifiers, and some are better than others, and they will help when you have weak stations that sort of come in, they do not work magic, no signal means no picture regardless of the amplifier.. But also know that the distribution part of the amplifier may be what you need. That is so you can run coax to 4 or 5 rooms, and get a good picture in each room. If you use a simple splitter, you will get a degradation of signal on each port of a simple splitter. So consider an amplified splitter, otherwise called a distribution amplifier.You can find all of that on Amazon, just read the reviews with a open mind, look for patterns in what people say, anything that is repeated over and over in each review, is likely true.The Channel Master antennas are the best you can get, even if support is lacking in some way. You should not really need support on an antenna. I will have to go find a nut to replace the stripped wing nut they gave me.My rating for 4 stars is because it is not going to be easy to install due to the large size, so no, it is not so easy to install. I am going to climb a tower and take down what I have now, then put this one up at 45 feet. 4 stars on easy to assemble, it might seam easy if you skip the steps I told you about, but if you didn't, it is not so easy. The oxidation paste is messy, so keep your hands clean, and wash them if you are done, before your touch anything you will put in your mouth, like food. Picture quality is always excellent.Know that the antenna will work well when you first put it up, no matter if you skip any of the steps I mention above, but over time, the antenna will degrade by getting the parts oxidized, which will hurt their ability to work at 100% of their ability.Update: I installed the antenna tonight, and while the smaller RCA antenna rated for 70 miles didn't get anything from Miami, which is way far from me, this antenna got a pretty good lock on Miami, but it could be better. There is no doubt about how much gain this antenna has, Miamia is over 2 hours south going 75 MPH down 95 South. I do get a lot more stations than I did, so I am happy with this antenna. I have it at about 45 feet up, pointing South.. If you put it in an attic, it can work well, but not if you have a metal roof. 4Most BANG for the buckGreat receive. an honest deep fringe antenna 65-100 mi during favorable conditions. A usable front to back ratio, good rejection off the back for my needs. Not the heaviest construction I have ever seen but average these days. In real life conditions I figure it will last 5-10 years. An innovative design (some type of gamma rod?) for the driven elements. Good receive across the design frequency. Works well for digital signal. You just need to make sure all elements are aligned and straight. The only thing I did was add small plastic wire ties to the insulators on the boom so they wouldn't chatter in the wind. I live in Erie Pa and have been having a blast pointing this thing at Canada during favorable conditions. 4Impressed, Picked up many clear channelsThis is a great option when you do not want to pay monthly for TV. We live in a very rural area and about 65 miles from the nearest station, so we purchased the 100 mile radius option. With this antenna set up on our roof, we were able to pick up 14 channels. This included local channels from the station 65 miles away, as well as local stations from about 80 miles away. The channels come in very clear and we have had no cutting in and out. The only bad thing about the antenna was the set-up. The instructions were very unclear and hard to understand, so you have to be somewhat tech savvy to set this thing up. If you currently have a dish (dish network or direct TV) wired throughout your house, this antenna can hook straight into the wiring system already there, which is what we ended up doing. You just need to remove the dish and replace it with the antenna. This saved us time in not having to string wire throughout our home to our TV. The antenna does not come with a bar/pole to secure it, so make sure to plan for that though. We have had some strong winds since we have had it installed and the antenna seems to hold up very well and weather does not seem to disrupt the channels at all. I am pleased overall with this product and excited not to pay a monthly fee for TV! 4Indoor antenna sold as outdoor antennaPurchased & had this antenna installed on the roof in October 2015. Performance was 100% until 3 weeks ago when there has either been no reception and/or spotty reception. Frustrated, I contacted Channelmaster technical support. CM indicated the antenna had a 90 warranty. CM suggested checking all connections. I have a small interior antenna that was used previous to the CM antenna & that is being utilized in the interim, so I told him the connections beyond the CM antenna are working. CM then told me the balun/matching transformer that connects the antenna to the coaxial cable on the roof may be the issue. CM indicated the balun may last for years, BUT if it gets wet there is an issue. Since this is an OUTDOOR antenna, it probably has been wet this summer. CM offered to send me the $3 part, but indicated I would have to pay $5 shipping. Generous, huh? CM indicated the parts are available at Best Buy. I just phoned Best Buy & ordered the part, since they don't stock them in-store. The part will be available for in-store pickup in two weeks. The much larger issue now is finding someone to climb back up on the roof to install it. The installer must somehow engineer a solution to protect the balun from the weather, since it can't get wet. Wouldn't you think an outdoor antenna would include parts & connections that could withstand the weather? Finding people to perform these tasks is extremely difficult & costly. 2Great multi-purpose HDTV (VHF+UHF) and FM antenna. But very big.There are a few things that this big antenna does not do well (it is not compact and easy to take down when a hurricane threatens), but for what I wanted it works very well. No need for an electronic amplifier/booster. Note that the specs in their literature states that the average gain for the multiple US TV bands are:VHF Lo: 3.6db (54-88 Mhz)VHF Hi: 8.6 db (174-216Mhz)UHF: 9.5db (470-806MHz)FM: ? (87.5 - 108 Mhz)HDTV: in my area there are both UHF and VHF-Hi HDTV stations - the main antenna farm is located only about 23 miles away, and most broadcasters are in the same general direction, but there are multiple large buildings in the way, and plenty of big trees even though I have the antenna mounted on a mast 24ft over the ground. I had the previous model of this beast before and knew that it would perform well enough for this job. I have no problem receiving the main HDTV stations in our area. Seems like a better image than the compressed signal from ATT Uverse.FM - I like to listen to a few college radio stations in our area and they are not strong broadcasters - this antenna has no trouble picking those stations up as well.Size - this antenna is big - a beast - fortunately made of mostly hollow aluminum and some plastic so it is not heavy. If you know about broadcasting and antennas, basically the higher the frequency the smaller the wavelength, and thus the smaller the antenna needs to be. UHF frequencies, where most HDTV is now days, do not require this giant antenna. However the lower frequencies VHF and FM require a larger antenna to achieve the same level of gain. Since I knew there were several HDTV channels broadcasting on VHF and I wanted FM reception of some weak stations I went with this solution. Do your homework and check through various online sites where your stations broadcast antennas are, and what frequencies they're on. For me, the downside to this size is that the antenna needs to be taken down in preparation for a hurricane, and that is not trivial.Directional - This antenna is also fairly directional and works best only when aimed correctly. Fortunately the main broadcast antennas for the stations I'm interested in are all within a few degrees of each other from my location. Do your homework and find out where those HDTV broadcast antennas are.Cons: The plastic parts are light and make good insulators for the best antenna design, but mechanically these parts will be fried in the South Florida sun and will not last. On my old antenna (very similar to this one), after 10 years, the plastic parts had become so brittle that one of the "arms" had broken off and was waving in the breeze (maybe a bird landed on it?). When I brought the old one down to repair it, many more plastic pieces broke. However, the old antenna may have been over 10 years old - so yes, the plastic parts are annoying in that they will break, but 10+ years is not that bad a lifetime. This new plastic and design looks a little sturdier than the old design so I'm hoping that it last longer in the SFL sun.The assembly is not completely trivial and there are some orientation issues with parts that might be helped with better instructions. I was able to get it done without help, but I think most people would consider me handy.Again this thing is big and required some thinking on where I would assemble it and how I would get it up onto the mast. I assembled it outside on the roof, as close to where I was going to need to mount it on the mast.----Next time I may experiment with some of the more modern "bow-tie" type antennas in the attic for the HDTV, along with a separate FM antenna for the FM receiver. I just did not want to hassle with the unknowns and additional wiring that setup would require. I knew this setup would work since it was replacing a very similar older antenna and every antenna recommendation site clearly states that outside and high up are the best mounting locations for the best signal. 5It's a beastThis thing is huge but not heavy. I'm in DE, about 40 miles from the Philly transmitters. I got it for one main reason - couldn't get VHF low, channel 6 ABC, on one of the newer style directional antennas. Oddly, I couldn't get channel 29 on UHF even though the other UHF channels were solid. Of course those two channels are the networks for the local NFL games that are must have. Both channels are good with this antenna. This is attic mounted, actually hung/suspended because it crossed over rafters sideways to point the right direction. Still can't get strong PBS but I got good signal on the other major networks. I use a preamp. VHF low was the seller on this. If you only need UHF I'd look to the smaller directional ones that run about $40. 5
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Description
  • LONG RANGE RECEPTION: 60 Miles (with an amplifier and increased installation height, a longer reception range can be achieved. In comparison tests, the CM-3018 has outperformed other outdoor tv antennas claiming reception ranges of 80+ miles)
  • OPTIMIZED FOR ALL CHANNELS: Designed to pick up Low VHF, High VHF, UHF and FM frequencies from all broadcasters including CBS, FOX, ABC, NBC, PBS, Univision, Telemundo and more. Will also support ATSC 3.0 and 4K broadcast when available.
  • RELIABLE HIGH GAIN PERFORMANCE: 8.2 dB (VHF), 8.4 dB (UHF)
  • TRUSTED QUALITY: Channel Master has been manufacturing antennas since 1949 offering best of class warranty & support. Constructed of high quality materials, Channel Master antennas are designed to withstand even the most extreme outdoor conditions.
  • EASY TO INSTALL: The antenna includes U-bolt mounting hardware which can be used to attach the antenna to a pole or mast and a step-by-step installation guide. [Note: Mast and Coaxial Cable Sold Separately]
  • Reception Range: Channels 2 thru 69 up to 60 miles
  • Picks up UHF, VHF, FM and HD
  • Easy Installation
  • Number of Elements: 30
  • Optimized for HDTV and Digital FM Signals
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Happy non cable guy.I purchased an Omni directional antenna before this, that was rated 75 miles, and all channels were pixilated so bad I had to return it and go back to cable. I was hesitant to buy this believing I would get the same results.The cable company I had just went all digital, which they advertised weeks ahead of time.I awoke March 7th to find all my channels scrambled and was told I would have rent a cable box for each tv that I have.That information was never released in their notifications.At that point I was finished with paying for bad cable service.I mounted this antenna at height of 19ft.I connected it to the original cable installed by the cable company and got only 16 of the 19 local channels some what clear.I pulled the cable company's cable and installed all new R6 quad shield cable that I purchased when I got the antenna.I now get all 19 channels available in my area crystal clear at full 1080p compared to the 480p-720p the cable company was charging me for.It's like the difference between DVD and 4k UHD on my 4k UHD tv.My nearest channel is at 31.8mi and the furthest is 36.6Extremely happy with my purchase and will never deal with the cable company again.Note! The instructions for this antenna are pretty much worthless. 5Arrived damaged, 12 feet long!When I opened the box, I was disappointed. The antenna was bent! This antenna IS NOT packed correctly for shipping. It just floats in the box, ready to bend as soon as the box gets any rough treatment. There is no protection whatsoever in the box.I was also surprised at how big this antenna is. The picture doesn't show that this antenna is 12 feet long! You know when you're driving out in the country, and you see someone with a GIANT antenna on their roof? It's probably this one.I set up the antenna anyway. I'm about 35 miles from the towers that I want to receive, but I keep my antenna in my attic, and the tiny antenna that I bought last summer just didn't work with the roof covered in snow. After filling half of my attic with this antenna, (and removing three of the splitters that the previous owners left in the cable line,) I now have crystal-clear skip-less reception in the dead of a snowy winter!A few tips:- Look at some of the smaller Channel Master antennas. This one is 12 feet long!- Once you extend out the antenna, it's impossible to collapse.- Remove all the splitters from your TV cableRated 3 stars because of the packaging, and because it's hard to see via Amazon that it's 12 feet long. What would make me rate this 5 stars?- Package this correctly! A little bit of molded cardboard would go a long way, and is fully recyclable & biodegradable.- The amazon listing needs to make this antenna's giant size much more obvious.- It needs to be easier to collapse the antenna. I don't think I can ever remove it from my attic without destroying it. 3The BestLet me save you the headache. The gain of 8.5db is under rated. This is the best antenna. Beats antennas that are 50in longer. I have tried 8 of the top rated antennas and this channell master pulled in channels over 120 miles as crow flys. Ironically works better for me without any amps on 3 TVs. Trick is one piece of coax RG6U don't use old school r59. If you install your own cons make sure your not grounding it out even one tiny strand hitting feed kills the signal. I used a Klien pro compression tool on ideal cons that fit perfectly in the tool. I tried the x-/:reme 200 in long monster had 4 less channels on the UHF side. Tried the "stacker" from Dennie's Antenna at over $300 but not like this signal strength is higher across the spectrum. Make sure you ground antenna to an 8ft electrical ground rod. Adds lightning protection and a ground plain for reception. Ground the mast not the antenna. Also make sure minimum 10ft off the highest point of your roof. cheers! 5Not what I expected from Channel Master.Having been an owner and installer for a television antenna sales company, I have some experience with antennas. (It was many years ago) It seems obvious to me that Channel Master did not manufacture this antenna. It appears (exactly) the same as an RCA antenna and the quality is nothing like the old Crossfire and Quantum antennas CM used to make. I believe, if my memory serves me, I used to be able to get these, made by a company called antenna craft , or something similar. I did some measurements and it seems like even the elements are just manufactured to just "look right" as compared to actually being cut to half or even quarter wave frequency length . Before I bought this antenna , I simply put up a piece of scrap PVC pipe with a balun at the Tee in the middle, and stripped twelve gauge copper, cut to the length of channel 7 half wave. ( two quarter wave lengths) I could not get channel 4 which I wanted. Even when I cut a halt wave length for channel 4, I still was not successful. So I bought this. I Still don't get channel four, and the other channels come in just about the same as the home made antenna, with the exception of now getting channel 62 which I did not get with my previous Home made. Fortunately for me, all my channels come from the same direction with relation to my location. My home-made was not designed for UHF, but since 21 AND 33 are strong and close, I still got them. All of that said, location of any antenna is much more important than the actual antenna. Keeping the coax as short as feasible and not adding any splitters is also a must, unless you plan to add amplification. Rarely will amplification make any difference except to over come line and split loss. Experience also tells me that the usual best spot for a home antenna is ten to twenty feet above a roof peak and pointing at the horizon in the direction of the signal with as few trees and hills in between as possible.This is not a quality antenna, but if you do not have a lot of obstructions in the way, this will likely do a decent job for you, but you might do just as well with rabbit ears in your attic, depending on the signal strength where you are. This is a poorly built and cheap antenna which can be found in many stores with other names. It is Radio Shack quality.Perhaps Wineguard still makes their own antennas, ( I don't know) in which case, for the money and quality, I would choose one of their platinum VHF UHF HD antennas over this. The number 8200 is one they used to use but I have no idea if the quality is the same as it used to be.This is the first antenna I have bought in many years and it is nothing like what used to be manufactured under the CM name when Joe Resnick was in Ellenville. I can assure you, I won't buy another Channel Master product. They seem to be using only the name with no concern for quality. 2Warranty called me within a short time of sending request, very helpful, but read my Update on the antennaThe antenna is rated for 60 miles, so you have to wonder what RCA was doing when they rated the other antenna that is a fraction of the size for 70 miles. I think they stretched the truth a bit. This antenna is huge, you won't want to assemble it in the house, do it in your driveway.Advice: use a aluminum anti oxidation compound that you can get in a Home Depot, or on Amazon, it is a paste that you put on the parts that connect together, then slide them together and wipe off any that squeezes out. I cover both parts, the pipe it goes into, and the part that goes into the pipe. There are two places like this, an if you do this correctly, the antenna can always be taken down and disassembled. if you don't do it, the parts will oxidize and become one, and very difficult to get apart, and probably ruined when you do get them apart.This antenna for 60 miles is 9 feet 4 inches long, and 7 feet 6 inches wide when assembled.If you live within 40 miles of most TV stations, you don't need an antenna this big. Also, the height above all around you will determine how well any antenna will work. If you put it in your attic, and have a metal roof, it won't work at all in your attic. If you don't have a metal roof, the attic is the last place to put it, but in a suburb of a big city, you may get good results in your attic. It all depends on where the Tv stations are. The bigger the antenna, the more gain it has. Gain is the amount of amplification the antenna will offer with nothing else but coax attached to it.There are distribution amplifiers, and some are better than others, and they will help when you have weak stations that sort of come in, they do not work magic, no signal means no picture regardless of the amplifier.. But also know that the distribution part of the amplifier may be what you need. That is so you can run coax to 4 or 5 rooms, and get a good picture in each room. If you use a simple splitter, you will get a degradation of signal on each port of a simple splitter. So consider an amplified splitter, otherwise called a distribution amplifier.You can find all of that on Amazon, just read the reviews with a open mind, look for patterns in what people say, anything that is repeated over and over in each review, is likely true.The Channel Master antennas are the best you can get, even if support is lacking in some way. You should not really need support on an antenna. I will have to go find a nut to replace the stripped wing nut they gave me.My rating for 4 stars is because it is not going to be easy to install due to the large size, so no, it is not so easy to install. I am going to climb a tower and take down what I have now, then put this one up at 45 feet. 4 stars on easy to assemble, it might seam easy if you skip the steps I told you about, but if you didn't, it is not so easy. The oxidation paste is messy, so keep your hands clean, and wash them if you are done, before your touch anything you will put in your mouth, like food. Picture quality is always excellent.Know that the antenna will work well when you first put it up, no matter if you skip any of the steps I mention above, but over time, the antenna will degrade by getting the parts oxidized, which will hurt their ability to work at 100% of their ability.Update: I installed the antenna tonight, and while the smaller RCA antenna rated for 70 miles didn't get anything from Miami, which is way far from me, this antenna got a pretty good lock on Miami, but it could be better. There is no doubt about how much gain this antenna has, Miamia is over 2 hours south going 75 MPH down 95 South. I do get a lot more stations than I did, so I am happy with this antenna. I have it at about 45 feet up, pointing South.. If you put it in an attic, it can work well, but not if you have a metal roof. 4Most BANG for the buckGreat receive. an honest deep fringe antenna 65-100 mi during favorable conditions. A usable front to back ratio, good rejection off the back for my needs. Not the heaviest construction I have ever seen but average these days. In real life conditions I figure it will last 5-10 years. An innovative design (some type of gamma rod?) for the driven elements. Good receive across the design frequency. Works well for digital signal. You just need to make sure all elements are aligned and straight. The only thing I did was add small plastic wire ties to the insulators on the boom so they wouldn't chatter in the wind. I live in Erie Pa and have been having a blast pointing this thing at Canada during favorable conditions. 4Impressed, Picked up many clear channelsThis is a great option when you do not want to pay monthly for TV. We live in a very rural area and about 65 miles from the nearest station, so we purchased the 100 mile radius option. With this antenna set up on our roof, we were able to pick up 14 channels. This included local channels from the station 65 miles away, as well as local stations from about 80 miles away. The channels come in very clear and we have had no cutting in and out. The only bad thing about the antenna was the set-up. The instructions were very unclear and hard to understand, so you have to be somewhat tech savvy to set this thing up. If you currently have a dish (dish network or direct TV) wired throughout your house, this antenna can hook straight into the wiring system already there, which is what we ended up doing. You just need to remove the dish and replace it with the antenna. This saved us time in not having to string wire throughout our home to our TV. The antenna does not come with a bar/pole to secure it, so make sure to plan for that though. We have had some strong winds since we have had it installed and the antenna seems to hold up very well and weather does not seem to disrupt the channels at all. I am pleased overall with this product and excited not to pay a monthly fee for TV! 4Indoor antenna sold as outdoor antennaPurchased & had this antenna installed on the roof in October 2015. Performance was 100% until 3 weeks ago when there has either been no reception and/or spotty reception. Frustrated, I contacted Channelmaster technical support. CM indicated the antenna had a 90 warranty. CM suggested checking all connections. I have a small interior antenna that was used previous to the CM antenna & that is being utilized in the interim, so I told him the connections beyond the CM antenna are working. CM then told me the balun/matching transformer that connects the antenna to the coaxial cable on the roof may be the issue. CM indicated the balun may last for years, BUT if it gets wet there is an issue. Since this is an OUTDOOR antenna, it probably has been wet this summer. CM offered to send me the $3 part, but indicated I would have to pay $5 shipping. Generous, huh? CM indicated the parts are available at Best Buy. I just phoned Best Buy & ordered the part, since they don't stock them in-store. The part will be available for in-store pickup in two weeks. The much larger issue now is finding someone to climb back up on the roof to install it. The installer must somehow engineer a solution to protect the balun from the weather, since it can't get wet. Wouldn't you think an outdoor antenna would include parts & connections that could withstand the weather? Finding people to perform these tasks is extremely difficult & costly. 2Great multi-purpose HDTV (VHF+UHF) and FM antenna. But very big.There are a few things that this big antenna does not do well (it is not compact and easy to take down when a hurricane threatens), but for what I wanted it works very well. No need for an electronic amplifier/booster. Note that the specs in their literature states that the average gain for the multiple US TV bands are:VHF Lo: 3.6db (54-88 Mhz)VHF Hi: 8.6 db (174-216Mhz)UHF: 9.5db (470-806MHz)FM: ? (87.5 - 108 Mhz)HDTV: in my area there are both UHF and VHF-Hi HDTV stations - the main antenna farm is located only about 23 miles away, and most broadcasters are in the same general direction, but there are multiple large buildings in the way, and plenty of big trees even though I have the antenna mounted on a mast 24ft over the ground. I had the previous model of this beast before and knew that it would perform well enough for this job. I have no problem receiving the main HDTV stations in our area. Seems like a better image than the compressed signal from ATT Uverse.FM - I like to listen to a few college radio stations in our area and they are not strong broadcasters - this antenna has no trouble picking those stations up as well.Size - this antenna is big - a beast - fortunately made of mostly hollow aluminum and some plastic so it is not heavy. If you know about broadcasting and antennas, basically the higher the frequency the smaller the wavelength, and thus the smaller the antenna needs to be. UHF frequencies, where most HDTV is now days, do not require this giant antenna. However the lower frequencies VHF and FM require a larger antenna to achieve the same level of gain. Since I knew there were several HDTV channels broadcasting on VHF and I wanted FM reception of some weak stations I went with this solution. Do your homework and check through various online sites where your stations broadcast antennas are, and what frequencies they're on. For me, the downside to this size is that the antenna needs to be taken down in preparation for a hurricane, and that is not trivial.Directional - This antenna is also fairly directional and works best only when aimed correctly. Fortunately the main broadcast antennas for the stations I'm interested in are all within a few degrees of each other from my location. Do your homework and find out where those HDTV broadcast antennas are.Cons: The plastic parts are light and make good insulators for the best antenna design, but mechanically these parts will be fried in the South Florida sun and will not last. On my old antenna (very similar to this one), after 10 years, the plastic parts had become so brittle that one of the "arms" had broken off and was waving in the breeze (maybe a bird landed on it?). When I brought the old one down to repair it, many more plastic pieces broke. However, the old antenna may have been over 10 years old - so yes, the plastic parts are annoying in that they will break, but 10+ years is not that bad a lifetime. This new plastic and design looks a little sturdier than the old design so I'm hoping that it last longer in the SFL sun.The assembly is not completely trivial and there are some orientation issues with parts that might be helped with better instructions. I was able to get it done without help, but I think most people would consider me handy.Again this thing is big and required some thinking on where I would assemble it and how I would get it up onto the mast. I assembled it outside on the roof, as close to where I was going to need to mount it on the mast.----Next time I may experiment with some of the more modern "bow-tie" type antennas in the attic for the HDTV, along with a separate FM antenna for the FM receiver. I just did not want to hassle with the unknowns and additional wiring that setup would require. I knew this setup would work since it was replacing a very similar older antenna and every antenna recommendation site clearly states that outside and high up are the best mounting locations for the best signal. 5It's a beastThis thing is huge but not heavy. I'm in DE, about 40 miles from the Philly transmitters. I got it for one main reason - couldn't get VHF low, channel 6 ABC, on one of the newer style directional antennas. Oddly, I couldn't get channel 29 on UHF even though the other UHF channels were solid. Of course those two channels are the networks for the local NFL games that are must have. Both channels are good with this antenna. This is attic mounted, actually hung/suspended because it crossed over rafters sideways to point the right direction. Still can't get strong PBS but I got good signal on the other major networks. I use a preamp. VHF low was the seller on this. If you only need UHF I'd look to the smaller directional ones that run about $40. 5
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